Clinton Camp Erupts as Fla., Mich. Delegates Get Half-Votes

"I am a designated representative of the Clinton campaign," Tubbs Jones said to Ausman. "Why don't you go about your business?"

The tension reflected high stakes were for both candidates, analysts said.

"You have Hillary Clinton feeling this is her best shot of getting the nomination," said ABC News' Cokie Roberts on "Good Morning America." "And you have a bunch of women who will be protesting outside, saying women's voices have not been heard."

DNC Chairman Howard Dean kicked off the DNC meeting with what may have been an olive branch to such women -- noting that the Democratic Party is about to pick a female or African American as its presidential nominee.

He also lamented the campaign's "blatant sexist comments," which he pinned, in comments interrupted by applause, on "some members of the media," as well as the campaign season's "blatantly racist remarks."

"We know those comments have no place in our society and certainly no place in our party and that will stop," Dean added. "And we need to come together and unite this party. And each one of us has a responsibility to ensure that that happens."

Obama adviser Dunn suggested a key to such healing rested with the Clinton campaign.

Obama's campaign expects to win around 38 delegates in the final three contests of Puerto Rico, South Dakota, and Montana. If he hits that mark, it would leave him about 30 superdelegates away from his party's nod.

The Obama campaign is pushing superdelegates to come on board by Tuesday so that Obama can claim his party's presidential nomination when he speaks that evening at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn.

The site was chosen because it is the same place where McCain will formally receive the GOP's presidential nomination in early September.

Asked if Obama would wait to get a concession call from Clinton before claiming the nomination, Dunn said the onus was on Clinton now that the Democratic Party has firmed up the number of delegates needed to claim the party's nod.

"He's not going to wait by the phone like a high-school girl waiting for a date," said Dunn. "That's not Barack Obama."

"After Tuesday," Dunn added, referring to the final contests of South Dakota and Montana, Clinton "can decide how united she wants this party to be."

ABC News' John Santucci, Karen Travers, Sunlen Miller, Sarah Herndon, Gregory McCown and Stephanie Dahle contributed to this report.

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