Glenn Beck Appeals to 'Restore' the U.S., Al Sharpton Commemorates Martin Luther King

Swailes, an African American, said it was the "divine revelation of God" that Beck's rally fell on the same day as King's speech without the conservative commentator knowing it.

Brock Lawley, a musician from Columbus, Ohio, came with five of his friends to attend the gathering. His reason -- to take the United States back to its conservative roots.

"Every direction you look, we've got a fiscal mess, a moral mess, the family unit's just completely crumbling," he said. "I think we need to take some real actions towards healing this and I don't think a place like this is a bad place to start."

Carol Hunt, from Las Vegas, said she feels socialists are destroying the country and she had a warning message for liberals who are running in the November mid-term elections.

"I believe in the concept of socialists destroying America. I think they've been wanting to for a long time," she said. "I think we as Americans are going to speak up and we're going to bring America back. ... We (conservatives) are going to take the country back and we're well on our way to take this country back. ... They're not going to get us."

None of the speakers overtly discussed politics, but Beck himself channeled President Obama, as the AP pointed out, borrowing a phrase from Obama's 2008 stump speech.

"One man can change the world," Beck said. "That man or woman is you. You make the difference."

While the security situation was mostly under control, Beck's supporters went head-on with protestors who came to oppose Beck's message -- fighting about everything from whether the country was moving toward socialism to whether Beck should have held the rally on the anniversary of King's speech.

"I think this is just pulling the country apart. This is not restoring anything but chaos," said Latisha Lee, a Washington, D.C. resident. "It's a joke, because he's not addressing everybody, just certain people who agree with him."

Abby Lachman said she was at the rally to protest peacefully, and while she said Beck had every right to hold the rally on the "I Have a Dream" anniversary, she was there to honor the civil rights leaders' legacy.

"We're just pointing out what Martin Luther King's message was, because Glenn Beck chose to speak at the same spot," she said.

ABC News' Tahman Bradley contributed to this report.

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