The Next Key Events in the Republican Presidential Primary Race

PHOTO:Donald Trump addresses supporters during a political rally at the Phoenix Convention Center, July 11, 2015, in Phoenix.PlayCharlie Leight/Getty Images
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With the shrinking field of GOP presidential candidates and the cancellation of the last scheduled Republican primary debate, the list of key events to watch out for is also growing smaller.

But amid talk of whether there will be a contested GOP convention in July, or whether there will be “riots” when they gather, there are still 23 state and territorial contests before then.

Of those, six states have more than 50 delegates at stake.

Here are some important events still to come in this turbulent nominating season.

PHOTO:Donald Trump is joined by Maricopa County, Ariz., Sheriff Joe Arpaio at a campaign event at the Roundhouse Gymnasium, Jan. 26, 2016, in Marshalltown, Iowa. Mary Altaffer/AP Photo
PHOTO:Donald Trump is joined by Maricopa County, Ariz., Sheriff Joe Arpaio at a campaign event at the Roundhouse Gymnasium, Jan. 26, 2016, in Marshalltown, Iowa.

Tuesday March 22: Headed to the Southwest

The next big primary comes in Arizona, where there are 58 delegates at stake in the winner-take-all state. Trump already has the backing of the state's infamous Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, but be on the lookout for more trips there by candidates over the weekend and in early next week.

Utah, which has 40 delegates, has their primary on the same day.

Tuesday April 19: Empire State of Mind

A whole four weeks pass, with just one primary (Wisconsin, a winner-take-most state that could change to winner-take-all, with 42 delegates) during that time, until the next big contest. If a candidate is able to amasses a majority in both congressional districts and the statewide population vote, a winner-take-most state can morph into a winner-take-all state.

New York holds its primary April 19, and Donald Trump is surely hoping to win his home state. Even if he does, however, he likely won't be taking home the state's 95 delegates, who are not governed by winner-take-all rules.

PHOTO: John Kasich speaks at a town hall meeting at Villanova University, March 16, 2016, in Villanova, Pa.Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
John Kasich speaks at a town hall meeting at Villanova University, March 16, 2016, in Villanova, Pa.

Tuesday April 26: Another Mini-Super Tuesday?

There are five states holding their primaries at this time. Delaware with 16 delegates, is winner take all, while Maryland with 38 delegates and Pennsylvania with 71 delegates have potential to become winner take all.

This marks the last primary day with more than two states at a time for six weeks.

PHOTO:Ted Cruz greets supporters during the Conservative Political Action Conference, March 4, 2016, in National Harbor, Md. Alex Wong/Getty Images
PHOTO:Ted Cruz greets supporters during the Conservative Political Action Conference, March 4, 2016, in National Harbor, Md.

Tuesday June 7: Rush for Gold in California

There'll be a new rush in California before the state's primary because there are a whopping 172 delegates at stake.

The delegate-heavy state also differs from others because it is a winner-take-most state, which means that delegates can be allocated to the winner depending on district-level results, as well as their state-level performance.

Montana, New Jersey and South Dakota also have their winner-take-all primaries that day, along with New Mexico, which allocates its 24 delegates differently.

PHOTO: Daytime shot of the exterior of The Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Dec. 28, 2008.David Liam Kyle/NBAE via Getty Images)
Daytime shot of the exterior of The Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Dec. 28, 2008.

Monday July 18: The Final Say

The potentially historic convention starts in Cleveland more than a month after the party's last primary. Whether it is contested depends directly on the delegate counts, and whether one of the three remaining candidates has reached the magic 1,237 number.

If not, there's the prospect of four days of internal battling in the Buckeye State.

Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that Wisconsin, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York were automatically winner-take all states; these could turn into winner-take-all states depending on the outcome. The story has also been updated with the U.S. territories still scheduled to have contests.