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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Revolutionary leader Fidel Castro waves to a cheering crowd upon his arrival after dictator Fulgencio Batista fled the island, Jan. 1, 1959, in Havana, Cuba.
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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Fidel Castro, center, meets with foreign dignitaries in in 1960, the same year that Cuba and the Soviet Union establish diplomatic relations.
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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Cuban leader Fidel Castro waves a document during his talk to the United Nations General Assembly, Sept. 26, 1960, in New York. The United States cancels its foreign aid program with Cuba in May, a few weeks after Cuba and the Soviet Union establish diplomatic relations.
    AP Photo
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Hours after a group of Cuban exiles, trained and coordinated by the CIA, launched an attack on Cuba at the Bay of Pigs with B-26 bombers, Adlai Stevenson, center, U.S. representative to the United Nations, denies charges by Cuba that the United States was a party to the invasion during a U.N. hearing, April 17, 1961, in New York City.
    Edward A. Hausner/New York Times Co./Getty Images
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Protesters stage a demonstration over the Cuban Missile Crisis at Whitehall in London in this 1960s photo.
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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    U.S. President John F. Kennedy addresses the United Nations General Assembly, Sept. 25, 1961, in New York.
    AP Photo
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Hundreds of mercenaries who participated at the anti-Castrist landing at the Bay of Pigs, which was backed by the United States, await judgment at the Havana court, April 10, 1962, in Cuba.
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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Fidel Castro drives a tank during the Bahia de Cochinos combats, April 17, 1962, in Cuba.
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  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Cuban soldiers demonstrate a beach gun they used during the Bay of Pigs invasion of 1961 in this 1962 photo in Playa de Giron, Cuba.
    Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    President John F. Kennedy meets with his cabinet officers and advisers about the Cuban missile crisis, October 1962, in Washington.
    Bettmann/CORBIS
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    President John F. Kennedy, right, meets with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, center, in the White House, Oct. 18, 1962, in Washington. Gromyko told Kennedy that Soviet aid was only for the "defensive capabilities of Cuba."
    Harvey Georges/AP Photo
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    President John F. Kennedy makes a national television speech about the naval blockade of Cuba, Oct. 22, 1962, from Washington. U.S. armed forces were ordered to DEFCON 3, the same level of readiness that followed the 9/11 terror attacks in 2001.
    AP Photo
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Prime Minister Fidel Castro gives a radio and televised speech, during which he speaks about the measures taken by the United States regarding Cuba, Oct. 22, 1962, in Havana.
    Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    Aerial view of the medium-range missile bases stationed in Cuba, Oct. 23, 1962, San Cristobal, Cuba. Kennedy said Russia had missile sites in Cuba and imposed an arms blockade. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev warned the president in a letter that there is a "serious threat to peace and security of peoples."
    AFP/Getty Images
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    President John F. Kennedy talks with aides and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara during the Cuban Missile Crisis, Oct. 29, 1962, in Washington, a day after Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev announced over Radio Moscow that he had agreed to remove the missiles from Cuba.
    CORBIS
  • 50th Anniversary of The Cuban Missile Crisis

    The U.S. destroyer Barry pulls alongside the Russian freighter Anosov off the coast of Puerto Rico to inspect cargo presumed to be missiles that were withdrawn from Cuba, Nov. 10, 1962. The United States removes its nuclear missiles from Turkey this month.
    AP Photo
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