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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    Jackie Kennedy was decades ahead of her time in describing the way Kennedy patriarch Joseph P. Kennedy pushed and encouraged his children. "I always thought he was the tiger mother," she said. Here, Joseph P. Kennedy sits surrounded by his family, circa 1930s.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    President Kennedy's children often played in the Oval Office. Here, he's entertained by Caroline, 5, and John, 2.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    "He used to say his prayers, really. But he'd do it so quickly ... he'd come in and kneel on the edge of the bed -- kneel on top of the bed and say them, you know, take about three seconds -- cross himself," Jacqueline Kennedy said of her husband. She said the bed-kneeling stopped once they got to the White House.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    "Anytime Lyndon would talk that night, Lady Bird would get out a little notebook -- I've never seen a husband and wife so ... she was sort of like a trained hunting dog. ... It was ... sort of a funny kind of way of operating," Jackie Kennedy said of the woman who would succeed her as first lady.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    President Kennedy liked to make up stories for his children. "He'd make up ... "Bobo the Lobo" and "Maybelle" -- some little girl who hid in the woods," his wife said in an oral history. "And then one day he was desperate. ... 'You've got to get me some books. I'm running out of children's stories. ... I just told Caroline how she and I shot down three Jap fighter planes.'"
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    President Kennedy was a voracious reader. "He'd read walking, he'd read at the table, at meals, he'd read after dinner, he'd read in the bathtub, he'd ... prop open a book on his desk on his bureau, while he was doing his tie...," Jacqueline Kennedy said. "He was just always reading, practically while driving a car."
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    President Kennedy met his hero Winston Churchill late in Churchill's life, and Jacqueline Kennedy said she felt "so sorry for Jack" because he met Churchill "too late. ... He just met Churchill when Churchill couldn't really say anything." This photo of Churchill was taken in the 1960s.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    After her husband was elected president, Jackie Kennedy told designer Oleg Cassini, who would design her wardrobe, that she wanted to dress "as if Jack were president of France." Cassini and Jacqueline Kennedy attend a costume party in the early 1960s.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    In the White House, President Kennedy tried to take a 45-minute nap every day. "He'd get completely undressed and into his pajamas and into bed ... sometimes when he had lunch in his room, in bed he'd have it. ... Then I'd close the curtains and open the window for his nap."
    Henry Griffin/AP Photo
  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    On Franklin D. Roosevelt, whom John Kennedy met as a child: "He often thought he was rather a -- 'charlatan' is an unfair word -- you know what I mean, a bit of a poseur, rather cleverly," Jacqueline Kennedy recalled in her oral history.
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    Jacqueline Kennedy had her own version of the A-bomb -- the snub. She described its deployment when Clare Luce, shown here, wife of Kennedy critic Henry Luce, wangled a meeting with Kennedy. "I managed to be just outside our dining room, standing there, pretending to shuffle through my desk, and I just really cut her dead, so when Jack introduced us I just stood with my hands at my side."
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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Recalls Camelot

    Jacqueline Kennedy was making small talk with Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev when she remarked that one of Russia's space dogs later had puppies and asked him to send her one. JFK was shocked when a dog arrived at the White House and his wife explained, "I was just running out of things to say [to Khrushchev]."
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