Obtained by ABC News
  • Frank Wills, a night watchman at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C., was making his rounds on the night of June 17, 1972, when he noticed a piece of tape he had already removed from the latch of a basement door in the complex's parking garage had been replaced and called the police. D.C. Metro police officers John Barrett and Paul Leeper, now retired, responded to the call. These photos were taken inside the offices of the Democratic National Committee headquarters after the five Watergate burglars were arrested.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • As Leeper and Barrett worked their way up through the building, they found the doors to the DNC offices also had tape on them. Leeper said he kicked the door open and Barrett pulled out his revolver. "The desk was all ransacked and disheveled," Barrett said. "We found out later that they were always messed up."
    Obtained by ABC News
  • James McCord, Bernard Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez and Frank Sturgis were the five men who had been directed to break into the DNC offices. The break-in was part of Operation Gemstone, a series of secret political tactics orchestrated by G. Gordon Liddy to gather negative intelligence on Nixon's opponents.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • Leeper and Barrett were working as plain clothes cops that night. When they started turning lights on in the DNC offices, Alfred Baldwin, who was a lookout, told the BBC in a 1994 interview that he radioed G. Gordon Liddy to ask if their guys were in business suits or plain clothes. When Liddy said suits, Baldwin told the BBC he said, "We've got a problem."
    Obtained by ABC News
  • When Leeper and Barrett shouted for the suspects to put their hands up, the officers in plain clothes found themselves facing a group of burglars in business suits. "McCord said to me twice, he said, 'Are you the police?' And I thought, 'Why is he asking such a silly question? Of course we're the police,'" Leeper said.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • The police uncovered numerous items from the burglars that night. "There were bugging devices...tear gas pens, many, many rolls of film...locksmith tools...thousands of dollars in hundred dollar bills consecutively ordered," Barrett said.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • "I don't think I've ever locked up another burglar that was dressed in a suit and tie and was in middle age," Leeper said. The officer said the men gave the officers false names.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • Leeper and Barrett, who were working in a plain clothes unit, responded to the call in an unmarked car without sirens. "If a uniform car had answered that call, it could have been a whole different ball game," Barrett said.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • Another photo showing evidence gathered from the Watergate burglars.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • The suspects used false names to book Rooms 214 and 314 at the Watergate Hotel to use as a base for the break-in. Officer Carl Shoffler is seen here in plain clothes inside Room 214 during the investigation.
    Obtained by ABC News
  • The crime report from the Watergate break-in. Barker, Sturgis, Gonzalez and Martinez pleaded guilty to charges involving conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping in January 1973. All served more than one year in prison. Liddy and McCord were convicted on charges of conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping the same month. Liddy served 52 months in federal prison. McCord served only four months.
    Obtained by ABC News
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