Sarah Palin: I Had to 'Walk the Walk'

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin doesn't get out much. Out of Alaska that is.

Last night, on her second trip outside the state this year, Palin reflected a bit on the experience of last year's campaign, repeated her call for energy independence and called on states to reject federal stimulus money.

Sarah Palin
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But it was her emotional and personal talk about the birth of her son Trig that was most revealing.

In front of an audience of nearly 3,000 anti-abortion rights advocates in Evansville, Ind., Palin described in detail how she struggled with her fifth pregnancy last year and choked up when she spoke about Trig's birth.

"It was a time when I had to ask myself was I gonna walk the walk or I was gonna talk the talk," Palin said.

She said she learned she was pregnant with Trig while she was out of the state at an oil and gas conference.

"There, just for a fleeting moment, I thought, I knew, nobody knows me here. Nobody would ever know. I thought, wow, it is easy. It could be easy to think maybe of trying to change the circumstances. No one would know. No one would ever know."

Ultimately, Palin said she realized she had to stay true to what she'd been saying for years -- that "life is valuable because it is ordained."

"I had just enough faith to know that trying to change the circumstances wasn't any answer," Palin said.

But the governor said the experience gave her an appreciation for what women and girls facing unwanted pregnancies go through.

"I do understand what these women, what these girls go through in that thought process."

The Vanderburgh County "Freedom for Life" banquet bills itself as the largest anti-abortion rights event in the nation.

Palin for President?

Superlatives aside, the county had to work hard to convince the former vice presidential nominee to attend a dinner three days before the end of Alaska's 90-day legislative session.

When Palin was first invited to speak last November, the request was added to a large pile. But this group persisted. They started sending her the" top 10 reasons" why she just had to come to Vanderburgh County. The reasons included things like: local chocolate, local doughnuts, Ski soda, barbecue, ice cream and an orchid. Palin came around.

"You know you had me at the chocolates," Palin told the crowd.

Palin had not been in Indiana since last October. In the weeks leading up to the election, she was tasked with making a final push to keep this red state red. It didn't quite work out that way.

Indiana turned blue and helped Barack Obama win the presidency. Vanderburgh County -- home to Evansville -- was one of the counties that helped the state tip. It went for Obama. who got 51 percent of the vote.

It's unclear what Palin's political ambitions are now. She has not yet said if she plans to run for re-election to the governor's office next year. She has not shut the door on a presidential run in 2012 either.

Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele was asked earlier by a reporter if he saw Palin as a "standard bearer" for the GOP in 2012.

"I think she's a standard bearer right now," Steele replied. But he said that the party had many women and men in leadership roles, including former Gov. Mitt Romney, Govs. Tim Pawlenty and Mark Sanford, former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Reps. Eric Cantor and Mike Pence.

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