Congress Urged to Take Action Against Bullying in Schools

The program grew out of their musical movie, "Milo J High," about the dangers of bullying and what can be done to prevent it. Other national youth programs, such as "Students Against Violence Everywhere," seek to engage students in their own safety.

"I recommend that a student involvement component, such as SAVE, be a part of every school's comprehensive safety plan," said Cassady Tetsworth, a member of the SAVE Youth Advisory Board.

Educators at the hearing called for "character education initiatives" to be built into school curriculums so students can learn ethical decision-making, behavior skills and conflict resolution tactics.

As principal of the Hannah Penn Middle School in York, Pa., Rona Kaufmann converted the in-school suspension room into a "character education room," where students were engaged in developing strategies to better manage their attitudes, anger and peer interactions. During the 2007-2008 school year, there was a 60 percent reduction in discipline referrals, down from 5,000 a year to less than 1,200.

"We now serve at Hannah Penn as a model program for other urban middle schools in Pennsylvania," Kaufmann said.

"Charter Education" May Be Necessary To Decrease Bullying

Steve Riach, founder of the Heart of a Champion Foundation, agreed that character development is essential to changing the landscape of violence in schools.

"It takes more than addressing those issues that would be solved by security guards, surveillance cameras and metal detectors," he said. "It takes a dedicated effort to change the heart."

According to Riach, students enrolled in his character-based curriculum have been found to exhibit less violence and perform better academically.

When it comes to measuring school violence, Kenneth Trump, president and CEO of the National School Safety and Security Services, argued that improved incident-based school safety data would greatly improve federal policy and funding decisions. According to Trump, Congress currently relies on survey-based data provided by the Education Department rather than incident reports.

"If we can't identify the problem, we're not going to be able to develop meaningful programs to intervene," he said.

Trump recommended passing the Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Act, introduced last session, which would require states to use the FBI's National Incident Based Reporting System in determining the "danger levels" of schools.

Several members of the panel also advocated the use of stimulus funds for enhanced school safety and called for incorporating enhanced protections into the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind.

As for Walker, she has found solace in speaking out about the issue surrounding her son's tragic suicide. She has become involved with GLSEN, The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, advocating for the passage of the Safe Schools Improvement Act, which would fund school programs to prevent bullying and harassment on the bases of actual or perceived sexual orientation.

"My son was only 11," she said. "He didn't indentify as gay or as straight or anything like that. He was a child. Those kids at his school called him those names because they were probably the most hurtful things they could think to say. And they hit their mark.

"I didn't really know what to expect when my contact with GLSEN brought me together with a diverse group of students, some of whom had been the victims of bullying," she added. "What amazed me the most was not how different we all were, but how much common ground we had. We shared our stories and it gave me hope and the courage to speak out on behalf of my son, Carl."

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