The Morning After Shift in Congress, GOP and Democrats Say They're Ready to Move On

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In Palin's home state of Alaska, Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski may win her write-in campaign, which would make her the first senator to successfully mount such a campaign since the 1954.

Murkowski was slated to lose her seat to Palin-backed Tea Party candidate Joe Miller, but an eleventh-hour surge pushed her ahead in the polls. Early this morning she held a majority of the vote with 41 percent over Miller and Democrat Scott Adams.

Recounts are a possibility in the Colorado Senate race where Ken Buck and Michael Bennet are locked in a dead heat and in Washington state, where Demcoratic Sen. Patty Murray holds a sliver-thin lead over Republican Dino Rossi.

And in Connecticut, Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Foley leads Democrat Dan Malloy by just a percentage point. Ballots there are still being counted after the state's biggest city ran out of ballots, prompting polls to stay open later.

Democrats Lose Support From Independents, Women

Democrats are expected to go back and take a look at who came out to the polls on Tuesday. In 2008, President Obama drew huge crowds of first-time voters, young people, independents and women.

But just two years later, the independent vote that factored so heavily in Obama's presidential win had switched over to the GOP.

Though women voters still leaned Democrat, the margin was, on average, just 1 percent compared with 13 percent in 2008. And women didn't come out to the polls in droves as they did two years ago.

But Obama is just the latest in a line of presidents who were forced to swallow a change in power during their first terms. Presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush all stood before the American people after mid-term elections and conceded that they would need to find a way to work with their opposition.

Tea Party leader, U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., who won his own race, vowed today to take advantage of the House majority in a way the GOP didn't previously.

"This does give Republicans a second chance and I'm glad to see the determination from Boehner and others in the House," DeMint said. "This time we're going to do it the right way."

Though candidate after candidate Tuesday night vowed to get to work, early cracks may be starting to appear in the victorious GOP.

"We make a grave mistake," Rubio said during his victory speech in Florida Tuesday, "if we believe tonight's results are the embrace of the Republican Party."

ABC News' Jonathan Karl, Jake Tapper, Claire Shipman and Neal Karlinsky contributed to this report.

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