Bob Woodward: Obama Determined to Find Afghanistan Exit Strategy

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White House: President Is 'Analytical,' 'Decisive'

The war strategy, as described in the book, could extend far beyond Iraq and Afghanistan. Woodward reports that the CIA has a 3,000 troop mostly Afghan "covert army," called the Counterterrorism Pursuit Team, or CTPT.

A U.S. official confirmed to ABC News the existence of this mostly Afghan army and that it's pursuing high-value targets.

Watch ABC's Diane Sawyer's exclusive interview with Bob Woodward starting on Monday Sept. 27 on World News and continuing on Nightline and Good Morning America on Tuesday Sept 28 Watch ABC's Diane Sawyer's exclusive interview with Bob Woodward starting on Monday Sept. 27 on World News and continuing on Nightline and Good Morning America on Tuesday Sept 28

"This is one of the best Afghan fighting forces, and it's made major contributions to stability and security," the official said.

"Obama's Wars" is in some ways seen as a continuation of Woodward's exhaustive behind-the-scenes chronicling of the Bush administration's foreign policy. Woodward wrote four books about President George W. Bush's White House: "Bush at War," "Plan of Attack," "State of Denial" and "The War Within."

Beyond detailing internal squabbles in "Obama's Wars," Woodward points to outright policy disputes. Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, said he believed the new strategy could work.

Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute, the president's adviser on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, said the president's reviews of the strategy going forward did not "add up" to his ultimate decision.

A senior administration official who read "Obama's Wars" told ABC News, "The president comes across in the review and throughout the decision-making process as a commander in chief who is analytical, strategic and decisive, with a broad view of history, national security and his role."

The official said of the book's descriptions of the infighting that "the debates in the book are well-known because the policy review process was covered so exhaustively."

White House officials said the book actually paints the president in a flattering light, as someone who seeks a breadth of advice and acts decisively. It provided excerpts from the book to support its point.

The president is said to focus his review of the Afghanistan strategy on key central questions, including "What can we realistically expect to achieve in the next few years? What presence do we have to have in Afghanistan in order to have an effective counterterrorism platform?"

The president is also described as being engaged in communications from the field, staying up late reading intelligence reports and pressing his aides on contradictions they contain.

Obama Confounded by the Contradictions

"I've been up at night reading intelligence reports," Obama said at one point in "Obama's Wars." Early on, the book describes Pakistan's overwhelming concern that the United States would pull out of Afghanistan and the region as it had done before. Later in the book, Obama cites a report warning that Pakistan dreaded having a large Afghan army on its border that might allie itself with India, while one of the U.S. objectives is to build that army. "How do you explain the contradiction?" Obama asked. "What exactly was Pakistan worried about -- too much or too little? What am I to believe?"

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