ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Views of life in Afghanistan have improved sharply in the past year: a 30-point advance in belief that the country's headed in the right direction, a 20-point gain among Afghans in expectations their own lives will be better and a 14-point rise in expectations that the next generation will have a better life.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Positive views of Hamid Karzai's performance as president have spiked by 19 points, to 71 percent, as he's asserted power for a second full term. While most Afghans suspect fraud in the election, many fewer think it was widespread.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Ratings of the Afghan Army and the national government have improved along with Karzai's. Views of the United States have also improved – but to a lesser degree, and remain far lower, as well as far below their peak.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Forty percent of Afghans now say the Taliban's grown weaker in the past year, a 16-point jump from a year ago.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Forty-two percent of Afghans now blame the country's violence on the Taliban, up sharply from 27 percent a year ago. Fewer, 17 percent, blame the United States, NATO or the Afghan government or army, well down from 36 percent.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Afghans now divide about evenly, 36-35 percent, on whom they blame more for civilian casualties in air strikes – U.S. and NATO forces, for poor targeting, or anti-government fighters, for being among civilians. This has eased from 41-28 percent a year ago. Civilian casualties are a highly sensitive issue, and Gen. Stanley McChrystal, leader of U.S. and NATO forces, has pushed efforts to reduce them.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    The number of Afghans who say attacking Western forces can be justified has dropped sharply, from 25 percent a year ago to 8 percent, a new low. It jumps to 22 percent in the restive South, but that's half what it was there last year.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Eighty-two percent of Afghans express confidence that "a system of freely voting for leaders" will work in Afghanistan; and 75 percent say they're satisfied with the outcome of last summer's presidential election.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    On the election itself, this poll finds majority suspicion of fraud in voting and vote counting alike – 56 and 60 percent, respectively, think these occurred. But far fewer (three in 10) see it as widespread fraud.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    There has been significant progress in some areas of local development. Fifty-six percent report new or rebuilt roads in their area in the past five years, up 21 points from 2007; half report new or rebuilt health clinics, up 13 points in the same period.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
  • ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll

    Despite low ratings for the U.S. performance, 68 percent of Afghans support the presence of U.S. forces in their country, and 61 percent support the troop surge ordered by President Obama. Very broad rejection of the Taliban is one factor; nine in 10 prefer the current Afghan government.
    ABC News/BBC/ARD Poll
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