GM offers to get exam during game

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Andy Milovich has offered to go this week where no man has gone before: A prostate exam in front of a full stadium of fans.

Milovich, the general manager of the Myrtle Beach Pelicans, the Single-A affiliate of theĀ  Texas Rangers, offered to have the exam while singing "Take Me Out To The Ball Game" during the seventh-inning stretch if local 10-year-old Fallon Emery, who has brain cancer, gets 10,000 likes on her Facebook page before the game.

"It's not like I would be getting it at home plate," Milovich said. "I'll likely do it from our radio booth and the fans will see me from the shoulder up."

Last week, Milovich was promoting Thursday night's game, which has a prostate cancer awareness focus, when a reporter for a morning talk show asked him if he was willing to get a prostate exam at the game.

In typical minor league fashion, Milovich's team went to work and decided to tie it to supporting the Facebook page of Emery, who has been battling brain cancer for the last seven months.

The team had already planned to give out 1,000 foam fingers with blue ribbons on them to the first 1,000 men age 18 and older. But if Emery's page gets 10,000 likes by noon ET on Thursday -- it was at 6,800 on Sunday at 2 p.m. ET -- Milovich will make good on his promise.

"If what we do saves a kid from having to lose his or her father because they get checked out, this will be worth it," Milovich said.

The team is raising money for Emery on Aug. 2, auctioning off items signed by sports luminaries, including South Carolina football coach Steve Spurrier and Clemson football coach Dabo Swinney.

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