Why should Marshawn Lynch talk?

It was the most honest answer he gave all day.

The thing about it is, Lynch's teammates don't care, so why should we? Sherman embraces the platform his success has brought him and has used it to try to encourage deeper thought about issues of race and the pervasive use of the word "thug" to describe African-American men. Lynch shuns the same platform his success has brought him. That's his right.

After thoughtfully answering question after question even after the allotted 60 minutes had expired, Sherman tweeted a picture of his view of the cameras from his podium and wrote, "Media Day was a blast!" As soon as the arena announcer declared the Seahawks' media session closed, Lynch turned to his right and headed for the exit.

"I just heard he did seven minutes," Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said of Lynch.

"He did 6:28," a reporter replied.

Carroll gave a fist pump and said, "Yeah."

Given how briefly Lynch spoke after the Seahawks beat San Francisco to advance to the Super Bowl, the 6½ minutes seemed like an eternity.

Some will call Lynch selfish for refusing to adequately fulfill his media obligations on the NFL's biggest stage. Lynch likely will be painfully quiet in the two remaining hourlong media appearances he must make before he can fully turn his attention to blasting through the Denver defense and trying to help Seattle win its first Super Bowl.

And if Lynch does just that and still doesn't want to talk about it, so what? Sherman reminded us that words matter. They matter to Lynch, too. He just doesn't want to share them.

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