NBA: Pivotal play 'correctly stood'

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PLAYA VISTA, Calif. -- A day after squandering a late 13-point lead against the Oklahoma City Thunder -- a collapse that left coach Doc Rivers railing into the officiating during his postgame news conference -- the Los Angeles Clippers collectively tried to let go of Game 5 and focus on Game 6 of their Western Conference semifinals series.

And the NBA seemed to do the same, defending the outcome of a play that came with 11.3 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter Tuesday, when it appeared the ball went out of bounds off Reggie Jackson but the Thunder were awarded possession by the referees after video review.

"With 11.3 seconds left in the game, the basketball went out of bounds on the baseline and the referees ruled the ball belonged to the Thunder," the league's president of basketball operations, Rod Thorn, said in a statement Wednesday. "The referees then used instant replay to review the play. In order to reverse the call made on the court, there has to be 'clear and conclusive' evidence.

"Since no replay provided such evidence, the play correctly stood as called with the Thunder retaining possession."

Prior to Thorn issuing the statement, Rivers said he spoke to the league office about the game, but said the content of that conversation was "private."

As of Wednesday evening, the NBA had still not determined whether Rivers would be fined for publicly criticizing the officiating, according to a league source.

Rivers had calmed considerably since his postgame comments when the incensed coach said his team was "robbed" of the victory and dubbed the call that went in favor of the Thunder with 11.3 seconds left a "series-defining play."

The coach chose to put Tuesday's 105-104 loss in the past, saying he would not file a formal protest with the league over the result. The defeat dropped the Clippers into a 3-2 series deficit.

Protests are a rarity in the NBA. They can be filed by a governor, alternative governor or head coach of a team and must be accompanied by a $10,000 check which will be forfeited if the protest is not granted.

During the 2007-08 season, the league granted the Miami Heat's protest to replay the final 51.9 seconds of their game against the Atlanta Hawks because the official scorer incorrectly ruled that Shaquille O'Neal had fouled out of the game. Before that, the league had not granted a protest since 1982.

"I don't ever do that," Rivers said before practice Wednesday. "I've never filed a protest in my life because I don't know what you get for it. You don't get the game back and you can't get (a do-over). It's funny, in Boston a couple times they wanted me to do it. I said, 'No thank you. I'll pass on that.'

"Listen, the one thing I know is no one does anything on purpose," Rivers added. "I don't believe in any of that stuff. So it happens, it happened and we move on."

Before the Clippers were ready to move on, they let the "sting" of the loss that puts their season on the brink of elimination set in, according to Blake Griffin.

First, on the bus ride from the arena to the airport late Tuesday night, Griffin and Jamal Crawford huddled with Chris Paul to try to convince the point guard that the loss wasn't his fault.

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