Matt Slocum/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNERS: The rules of the Major League Baseball playoff beard are simple. On the first day of playoffs, start growing a beard. Don't shave until your team is knocked out. Some do it for superstition, some do it for tradition, some don't buy into either, but we salute those who "stepped up to the plate" and grew impressive playoff beards. Shane Victorino, Red Sox outfielder, is definitely a winner.
    Matt Slocum/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: David Ross, Red Sox outfielder. The playoffs are winding down, meaning there are fewer bearded candidates to choose from, but there must be something in the water in Boston because the Red Sox men have an impressive and unmatched ability to grow thick facial hair. Case in point: outfielder David Ross. Well done, sir.
    Matt Slocum/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: Mike Napoli, Red Sox first baseman. Is that a lumberjack on the Boston Red Sox team, or just first baseman Mike Napoli? With locks of thick, flowing hair coming off his face, Napoli knows how to grow an impressive beard.
    Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: Brian Wilson, Dodgers relief pitcher. When it comes to crowning the greatest playoff beard of all time, Brian Wilson is king. So mighty is his beard that Dodgers fans will wear replica black beards to games. And it even has its own Facebook page. "Brian Wilson's Beard" has more than 32,000 likes.
    David J. Phillip/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Red Sox catcher. Jarrod Saltalamacchia has grown a beard almost as long as his last name for this year's playoffs. His bizarrely thin mustache juxtaposed with his bushy beard gives him a kind of Victorian-privateer-meets-woodsman look.
    Elise Amendola/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: Johnny Gomes, Red Sox outfielder. With a strong stock of facial hair protruding from his chin and a stern look about him, Gomes looks like he could be an Army captain from the Civil War.
    Matt Slocum/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    WINNER: Dustin Pedroia, second baseman. Like many of his Red Sox teammates, Dustin Pedroia has grown a playoff beard so well that his whiskers are long enough to tug. That's a sign of a beard worth saluting.
    Paul Sancya/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    LOSER: Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers pitcher. On the mound, Clayton Kershaw is an ace. But growing a worthy playoff beard is not his game. While Kershaw does have quite a swath of facial hair, most of it appears on his neck and underchin instead of his face.
    David Goldman/AP Photo
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    LOSER: Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers first baseman. Fact: A goatee is not a beard, so sorry Adrian Gonzalez, but we're putting you in with the playoff beard losers. With his thick facial whiskers forced into a goatee, it's clear the Dodgers first baseman could have an impressive beard if he wanted to, but it's an opportunity sadly missed.
    Harry How/Getty Images
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    LOSER: Xander Bogaerts, Red Sox shortstop. While many of his fellow Boston teammates went into full facial assault with their playoff beards, Xander Bogaerts stuck with his soul patch.
    Jared Wickerham/Getty Images
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    LOSER: Junichi Tazawa, Red Sox pitcher. We respect you, Junichi Tazawa, for how you play the game, but shake our heads at your lack of beard. A few whiskers on the chin just won't cut it.
    Jamie Squire/Getty Images
  • Playoff Baseball's Winning and Losing Beards

    LOSER: Torii Hunter, Tigers right fielder. We're going to let him finish the season, but Torii Hunter had one of the iconic moments of the playoffs this year when he took a tumble into the Fenway Park bullpen while chasing Red Sox's David Ortiz's game-tying grand slam. But he has no beard, or any facial hair, for that matter, to show for it.
    Stan Grosfeld/The Boston Globe/AP Photo | Charles Krupa/AP Photo
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