What If the Pros Treated Baseball Like the Little League Does?

PHOTO: Former Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez wears some big glasses given to him by a fan as he gave out Good Humor ice cream from their truck parked across from the Copley T station as part of the "Share the Love" campaign.
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Sure, Little League players are younger and less experienced than stars of Major League Baseball, but that doesn't mean the pros can't learn something from the kids' league.

Here's how MLB games would be different if they adopted the Little League's approach to baseball:

4 Things to Watch for in the Little League World Series

Little League Coach Gives Heartwarming Pep Talk After Loss

1. We Would Learn These Adorable Facts

Did you know Derek Jeter’s favorite movie is “American History X”? Or that David Wright loves sushi and pizza, and Boston Red Sox Slugger David Ortiz’s good-luck charm is an ESPN cameraman?

You might if they played for the Little League.

Instead of splashing players’ batting averages and home run stats beneath their names when they go up to bat, the kids’ league offers fun facts about their favorite foods, movies and nicknames.

PHOTO: David Wright, seen in this July 21, 2014 file photo taken during a Mets game against the Seattle Mariners in Seattle, Wash.
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
PHOTO: David Wright, seen in this July 21, 2014 file photo taken during a Mets game against the Seattle Mariners in Seattle, Wash.

2. Sweet Pep Talks Would Replace Timeouts

When a Little League coach addresses the team during a game, it’s usually to offer a few gentle words of encouragement – “You’re doing great, keep it up!” – or a reminder that it is, after all, just a game.

Viewers can watch the sweet exchanges on TV at home, and you can hear the whole conversation.

It doesn’t work like that in the MLB. Players are earning multimillion-dollar salaries, and a loss hurts their career, not just their egos.

3. More Overzealous Parents …

Think about it: When was the last time you saw a major leaguer’s mom going crazy in the stands? Or terrorizing a coach for not letting her son on the team?

But at Little League games, it happens. Parents can get pretty excited about seeing their kids on the field – and making sure they get adequate playing time – especially in the World Series.

In the MLB, where teams play 162 games every summer, that allure probably wears off quickly.

PHOTO:Melky Cabrera, Toronto, Jose Bautista, and Anthony Gose of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrate the 7-2 win with a dance in the outfield.
Barry Chin/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
PHOTO:Melky Cabrera, Toronto, Jose Bautista, and Anthony Gose of the Toronto Blue Jays celebrate the 7-2 win with a dance in the outfield.

4. … But Fewer Drunken Fans

Booze isn’t allowed at Little League games, so forget about those overpriced beers.

Unless fans are imbibing before the game starts, expect a dry crowd.

5. Sportsmanship Is on Full Display

Imagine a baseball league free of dirty secrets like corked bats, doctored balls and steroid scandals.

That’s what the Little League is. Even in games as high-stakes as the World Series, players are all smiles, gleefully fist-bumping opponents as they cross the field between innings. Kids don’t fight with the umpire, or each other or their coaches, for that matter.

PHOTO: A Little League team sits in a dugout in this undated stock photo.
Getty Images
PHOTO: A Little League team sits in a dugout in this undated stock photo.

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