TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    A new TLC one-hour special explores the highly controversial practice of cloning animals and the people who pay thousands to have their beloved deceased pets brought back to life through cloning. Danielle Tarantola from Staten Island, N.Y. paid around $50,000 to have her dog Trouble cloned to make a new dog, Double Trouble, shown here. "I Cloned My Pet" airs Wednesday, Jan. 11 at 9 p.m. ET on TLC.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    Danielle Tarantola spent 18 years with her beloved dog Trouble, shown here, before he died three years ago. After his death, she had a small sample of his cells harvested for cloning. Danielle maintains a shrine for Trouble inside her Staten Island home and even preserved the last piece of chicken he ate from.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    Like Danielle, Peter Onruang lost his dog Wolfie three years ago. Peter had the dog's DNA harvested and sent to <a href="http://sooam.com/" target="external">South Korean scientists</a> to make a clone. Shown here is the new Wolfie. Scientists use at least 10 host dogs to carry the embryo clones to term, but sometimes the new cloned puppies are born with abnormalities and do not survive.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    Shown here is a photo of the original Wolfie. Peter Onruang rescued his dog from the then- tough streets of Los Angeles, Calif., at a time when Peter was on a dangerous downward spiral. Peter said he was hanging out with the wrong crowd and said the night he was shot changed everything.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    In Santa Fe, N.M., Sheryl Anderson succeeded in cloning her beloved dog Blue, and TLC follows his clone, Blue Frankenstein II, shown here, as he made his way back from South Korea. Bioethicists say cloning these pets in a lab with host animals raises numerous animal welfare issues.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    Photo of original Blue. Sheryl Anderson is currently in prison awaiting trial so she might not ever get to see her beloved Blue II clone dog.
    TLC
  • Cloned Animals

    Animal cloning entered public debate in 1996, when Dolly the sheep became the world's first cloned mammal. Dolly is shown in this undated photo at the Roslin Institute in Scotland.
    Getty Images
  • Cloned Animals

    Since Dolly, numerous other animals have been cloned, from farm animals to domestic pets. A 6-month-old cloned calf named Gene licks the lens hood of a television camera in DeForest, Wis., Aug. 7, 1997. The black bull calf was the result of cloning a stem cell from a 30-day-old calf fetus and was the first of its kind.
    Morry Gash/AP Photo
  • Cloned Animals

    CC, the first-ever cloned cat, is shown here at 7-weeks-old, Feb. 8, 2002, in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University. The female domestic shorthair is called "cc" for "copycat'' and was born Dec. 22, 2001.
    Texas A&M University/Getty Images
  • Cloned Animals

    Prometea, front, is shown with its mare, June 4, 2003, in Cremona, Italy. Prometea, born on May 28, 2003, was the world's first cloned horse according to its creators, scientists at the Laboratory of Reproductive Technology in Cremona. The cloned Haflinger horse was named Prometea after Prometheus, the character in Greek mythology who stole fire from the gods and gave it to humans.
    Giovanna Lazzara/AP Photo
  • Cloned Animals

    Texas A&M clinical veterinarian Dr. Alice Blue-McLendon watches Dewey, the first cloned white-tail deer in the world, take a drink of water in one of the outside pens at the university in College Station, Texas, Dec. 22, 2003. Dewey is believed to be the first successfully cloned deer, said officials at A&M, which has cloned a total of five species, including cattle, goats, pigs and a cat.
    Dave McDermand/Bryan-College Station Eagle/AP Photo
  • Cloned Animals

    South Korean stem cell researcher Hwang Woo-suk poses with Snuppy, the first successfully cloned dog, during a press conference at the Seoul National University, Aug. 3, 2005.
    Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images
  • Cloned Animals

    Bernann McKinney holds one of five cloned Pit bull puppies during her first meeting with them at the Seoul National University Hospital for Animals in Seoul, South Korea, Aug. 5, 2008. McKinney has received five baby dogs -- copies of her beloved late Pit bull Booger -- from a South Korean biotech firm. She was the first customer for firm that promises a "canine cloning service."
    Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images
  • Cloned Animals

    These dogs may look like typical, playful puppies, but James Symington's German shepherds have a lot more to live up to than learning to sit. Trust, Solace, Valor, Prodigy and Deja Vu are clones, created from the DNA of a 9/11 search and rescue dog named Trakr who was credited with pulling the last survivor out of the rubble on Sept. 12, 2001.
    Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images
  • Cloned Animals

    Sir Lancelot Encore, a yellow Lab, with owners Nina and Edgar Otto in Boca Raton, Fla., Jan. 28, 2009. Encore was cloned from the cryogenically frozen DNA of the Ottos' deceased dog Sir Lancelot, shown in the framed photo. The couple paid $155,000 and the Korean-based Sooam Biotech Research Foundation made a genetic replica of "Lancy" -- Encore is the first commercially cloned puppy in the U.S.
    Gary I. Rothstein/EPA
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus