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  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    Ants live in colonies of millions, building underground homes and trails. Most ants are worker ants, which gather food and building supplies. They have a keen sense for your picnics, sweet treats and any food laying around. In the summer heat, keep your food and drinks wrapped up, or you will be sharing it with millions of these critters.
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  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    Next time you shoo a fly away, remember this cutie pie face. He is on the hunt for your food.
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  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    The honey worker bees are the only bees that most people ever see. They forage for pollen and nectar and protect their hive. If you get too close, they will sting. Keeping sweet fragrances around could have these busy bees buzzing too close for comfort. Stay calm and try not to swat them away and, hopefully, they will get the hint and buzz off.
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    This microscopic view of a glasswinged butterfly demonstrates a new type of high-definition photography. Photographer Stefan Diller uses high-powered microscopes and computer software to create the fascinating movies and still images. He spent three years perfecting the painstaking process at his laboratory in Wuerzburg, Germany.
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media /Landov
  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    This crab-like creature is the deer tick seen from a microscopic image. Known for biting and burrowing deep within your flesh, these munchers carry lyme disease, passing it on to its victims. Make sure to wear long sleeves and pants when strolling in the summer meadows.
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  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    The dragonfly keeps these iridescent green eyes ready for a good meal of fresh mosquitoes. Although their look and "buzz" is startling, these little guys like to eat mosquitoes, leaving less of those blood-suckers to feast on us!
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    A furry set of scissors? This is actually a microscopic view of a honeybee head.
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media/Landov
  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    Here is a microscopic view of a common mosquito. These insects love humidity, heat and human flesh. Take precautions when hanging outside in the summer months by spraying bug spray or burning some sage to keep these blood-suckers away.
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  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    The horsefly, the Tabanus bovinus, is one mean fly. It is known to bite humans and livestock, transmitting disease and leaving painful welts. The females are the biters, as they need blood in order to reproduce.
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    Do you think this is a warthog about to break out in the song, "Hakuna Matata"? This little honeybee doesn't have much of a friendly face.
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media/Landov
  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    This image looks like corduroy feathers and textured cornstalks, but it's a microscopic view of a glasswinged butterfly.
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media/Landov
  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    A side view of the butterfly shows how long their straw-like tongue really is. They drink through a tongue called a proboscis. It uncoils to sip liquid food, and then coils up again when it is done feeding.
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    A side microscopic view of a glasswinged butterfly (Greta oto).
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media/Landov
  • Invasion of the Summer Insects

    The beautiful, delicate, winged insect always bring happiness when they flutter by. However, taking a closer look at this beautiful butterfly shows us a much less friendly smile greeting us. Let's try and keep these beauties at a distance.
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    The flying lasius queen ant seems to be frowning. Ants are a picnic's mortal enemy. They are never invited and bring way too many friends.
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  • Bugged out - Microscopic Photography

    This microscopic view of a glasswinged butterfly demonstrates a new type of high-definition photography. Photographer Stefan Diller uses high-powered microscopes and computer software to create the fascinating movies and still images. <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/us/photogallery" target="external">Click here for ABCNEWS's Photo Gallery</a>"
    Stefan Diller/Barcroft Media/Landov
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