European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    Missing NASA satellite images because the federal government shutdown? The European Space Agency has it covered with their "Observing Earth" series of photos. South Korea's Kompsat-2 satellite captured this image over the sand seas of the Namib Desert, Jan. 7, 2012. The blue and white area is the dry riverbed of the Tsauchab. Namib Desert, May 10, 2013.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    A rare cloud-free view of Ireland, Great Britain and northern France, Jan. 1, 2013.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    The Spanish city of Barcelona is pictured in this image captured, Sept. 13, 2010, by Japan's ALOS satellite. Near the top right corner, the circular Plaça de les Glòries Catalanes was meant to be the city center in the original urban plan. Dominating the left side of the image are the Garraf Massif Mountains, their cliffs reaching the Mediterranean coast.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    Rolling hills of farmland in the northwest United States are pictured in this image from the Kompsat-2 satellite. Acquired over Washington State, the south and west areas of the image are in Walla Walla County, while the central-eastern-upper area is Columbia County. The area pictured is part of the Palouse region - an agricultural zone that mainly produces wheat and legumes.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    An area covering northern Namibia and southern Angola is pictured in this Kompsat-2 image. Running across the image, the Okavango River forms the border between Namibia to the south and Angola to the north. Zooming in on the upper left corner, dots of white and other bright colors near a road show rural settlements.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    Central Panama and its 48 mile-long ship canal that connects the Atlantic - via the Caribbean Sea - and Pacific Oceans are pictured in this Envisat image. On either end of the canal, ships that are entering, exiting and waiting to cross the waterway appear as dots of red, green and blue.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    South Korea's Kompsat-2 satellite captured this image of southern central Romania, Jan. 2, 2013. The area pictured is part of a geographic transitional region between the Southern Carpathians to the north and the lowland plains to the south. The tree branch-like pattern is the result of erosion along rivers and streams.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    Uluru/Ayers Rock in the Australian outback is featured in this image from the Kompsat-2 satellite. The rock formation is an Inselberg - German for "island mountain" - a prominent geological structure that rises from the surrounding plain. Hundreds of millions of years ago, this part of Australia was a shallow sea.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    This Envisat composite image shows the French island of Corsica, one of the largest islands in the Mediterranean Sea. Corsica is located just 56 miles west of Italy, and 105 miles south of France. Sardinia is just to the south across the Strait of Bonifacio, and a couple of Sardinian islands along the bottom of the image can be seen. In the top, right corner is the Italian island of Capraia.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    This image is a compilation of three radar images from the Japanese ALOS satellite and shows the Po River, which flows over 404 miles from west to east across northern Italy, as the country's longest river. Agriculture is one of the main economic uses of the Po Basin because of the fertile soils, and this image clearly shows a landscape dominated by fields.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    The New Caledonia archipelago, 752 miles east of Australia, is captured in this Envisat image, July 5, 2011. The main island, Grande Terre, dominates the image, stretching 207 miles long from northwest to southeast. A mountain range runs the length of the island - its highest point reaching over 1 mile - and divides the land's lush east from the savannahs in the west.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    Deep in the Sahara Desert, the Al Jawf oasis in southeastern Libya is pictured in this image from Japan's ALOS satellite. The city can be seen in in the upper left corner, while large, irrigated agricultural plots appear like Braille across the image. Between the city and the plots, the two parallel runways of the Kufra Airport can be seen.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    The Tibesti Mountains, located mostly in Chad with the northern slopes extending into Libya, are captured in this image, March 4, 2012, by Envisat's MERIS instrument. The mountain's highest peak is Emi Koussi - pictured here as a circular structure in the lower-right portion of the dark area. The westernmost volcano is Toussidé.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    This Envisat image highlights the Ganges Delta, the world's largest delta, in the south Asia area of Bangladesh (visible) and India. The delta plain, about 207-miles wide along the Bay of Bengal, is formed by the confluence of the rivers Ganges, the Brahmaputra and Meghna.
    European Space Agency
  • European Space Agency's Satellite Photos of Earth

    This image acquired on Jan. 4, 2012 by the Pleiades satellite shows part of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. The light blue area near the center of the image is the man-made Burj Khalifa Lake. Next to the lake sits the Burj Khalifa skyscraper that is the tallest man-made structure in the world. Its long shadow is cast to the north (to the right in this image).
    European Space Agency
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