Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    With 2,000 pounds of sheer brute strength, an enormous set of teeth and a jaw that could snap a human in half, crocodiles are incredibly fierce and deadly predators. They are largest reptiles on Earth. A whip of their tails can shatter bone and they can hoist their massive bodies 8 feet out of the water to snatch prey from the air.
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    National Geographic's Dr. Brady Barr, is the only man to capture every species of crocodile in the world. He recently helped wrangle a crocodile from Lake Victoria after it was rumored the animal had killed 21 people in a small Ugandan village.
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    National Geographic spent a year tracking saltwater crocs, or "salties," found in the billabongs of Australia's northern territories. According to Barr, they are the some of the most dangerous and aggressive crocs in the world. "They're apex predators," he said. "They're at the top of the food chain. When you can reach lengths of 20 feet and weigh one ton, pretty much anything is on your dinner plate, including, sadly, humans at times."
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    During the wet season, animals come to rivers and streams in droves and the water becomes a feeding ground for the crocodile. Whether it's a duck in flight or a wallaby sitting on the riverside, this predator's incredible stealth and power leaves its victims little chance of escape. Crocs will also swallow rocks to help with digestion in their stomach.
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    When a croc grabs a meal, it'll thrash it around to break down the food. "Crocodiles' teeth aren't designed to chew. They're peg-like. They're very sharp. They're needle sharp, but they alternative upper, lower, upper, lower. They don't chew," Barr explained. "They have the strongest bite of any animal on the planet...then they do what's called the death roll...it's like ripping a piece of paper out of a notebook because you have these deep, deep puncture wounds [on the prey]."
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    When the wetlands dry up in the fall, saltwater crocodiles are forced to follow the shrinking water supply. They crowd into shallow, muddy ponds to escape the heat. This "salty" didn't get far. With no water and no relief from the scorching sun, he died in the mud. "The big danger for them is overheating if there is no water," Barr said. "Once they get away from water, they're in serious jeopardy."
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    The "salties" have been around for 100 million years, but just one percent of their offspring make it to adulthood. Babies are the size of a candy bar at birth and become easy targets for storks, dingoes or other crocodiles. "They're protective of babies," Barr said. "It's not just the mother. When a baby gives a distress call...any adult crocodile will investigate. They're really good parents."
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
  • King Crocs

    Maintaining an internal temperature of around 89 degrees is vital for the crocodile's health. Some scientists now believe that when crocs sit on the shore with their mouths agape, they're actually trying to cool their brains. "These aren't stupid animals," Barr said. "They're very, very complex, very successful predators."
    Courtesy National Geographic, "King Crocs" premieres Dec. 3 on National Geographic Channel
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