National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    Great white sharks, with their powerful, torpedo-shaped bodies, are the biggest predatory fish in the world. But scientists say "Jaws" and "Shark Week" have distorted our view of sharks and, what's worse, led to a decades-long slaughter of them.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    In "Shark Attack Experiment: LIVE," a team of experts are diving into shark-infested waters in order to run a series of tests. Their mission: to get a better understanding of shark behavior. Beyond that, these shark lovers hope the results will help debunk some of the fears that are driving human killings of sharks around the world. Here, Olivia Symcox performs the 'Bare Skin Bikini' test.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    Do sharks prey on human flesh? One of the things the shark team wants to know is what role, if any, our bare skin has in provoking sharks to strike. In this test, Olivia Symcox explores the sharks' reaction to her as she, clad only in a bikini, swims among a swarm of blacktip sharks.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    Sharks' inner ears, combined with an organ called the lateral line, form a highly sensitive hearing- and vibration-detection system. In this test, divers use props to observe the sharks' reactions to sounds. Sound frequencies are measured to see what role they might play in triggering shark attacks. Here Gail Addison tests the "Crackling Bottle Sound" experiment while a Cow Shark circles her.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    Some believe that sharks may be attracted to swimmers with reflective jewelry or small cameras, mistaking them for sardines or other small prey. Hence the "bling test." Olivia Symcox, under water in scuba gear, runs the "bling" experiment with Cow Sharks. A marked change in the sharks' behavior may indicate that a glittery swimsuit might better be left at home.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    Scientists have found that olfactory bulbs of the great white shark comprise 18 percent of brain mass—the largest proportion of any shark measured—suggesting that their sense of smell is highly important. Here Gail Addison releases urine from a bottle to see if sharks are attracted to the scent.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    Gail Addison performs the 'Bare Skin Bikini' test. Her gesture jokingly suggests the 'Urine' test as well, meaning urine may have recently been released from a bottle to see if it attracts or repels sharks. Two sharks swim nearby.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    The great white shark is possibly the most feared predator on the planet. Its diet consists mainly of fish, turtles, dolphins, porpoises, sea lions and seals. The great white is responsible for fewer than 300 unprovoked incidents around the globe involving people. It's believed that when great whites attack humans, it's more likely due to their natural curiosity rather than their appetite.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    Nurse sharks are slow-moving bottom-dwellers. They are, for the most part, harmless to humans. Nurse sharks can be huge, up to 14 feet in length, and have very strong jaws with thousands of tiny, serrated teeth. They will bite defensively if stepped on or bothered by divers who assume they're docile.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    National Geographic, in its 9-hour 'Sharkathon,' says sharks are misunderstood. Attacks on humans are spectacular and fearsome, but also very rare.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    Tiger sharks are notorious for eating almost anything, from sea turtle shells to birds to plastic bottles. They generally hunt alone at night. They are curious fish and considered potentially dangerous to humans. They're second only to great whites in recorded human attacks, but due to their indiscriminate appetite, they are less likely to swim away after biting a human.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    Ragged tooth sharks prefer to swim in coastal waters and around coral reefs. They're bulky-bodied, maxing out at just over ten feet in length, and have a lifespan of over 15 years. Sand tigers are the only shark species that will actually swim to the surface, gulp air, and hold it in the stomach. This behavior allows them to stay buoyant and motionless in the water as they stalk prey.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    Sharks circle their prey as they feed.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    A National Geographic crew prepares for a dive to study sharks and their attack patterns.
    Handout
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    The ragged tooth shark, better known as the sand tiger shark, has been placed on the IUCN's Red List of vulnerable species, due in part to its low rate of reproduction and threats like commercial fishing.
    National Geographic
  • National Geographic's Shark Attack Experiment Live

    The Nat Geo WILD channel, in its nine-hour 'Sharkathon,' says 17,000 people die in falls each year. That's a 1 in 218 chance over your lifetime, compared to a 1 in 11-million chance of being killed by a shark.
    National Geographic
  • Shark Attack! Nat Geo Wild's Sharkathon

    National Geographic's "Shark Attack Experiment LIVE" airs Friday, Nov. 25 on Nat Geo WILD. Watch the full story on "Nightline" tonight at 11:35 p.m. ET
    National Geographic
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