Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    In a glass, it's not much to look at. But under the microscope, your favorite cocktail is a sight to behold. With a process developed at Florida State University, <a href="http://bevshots.com/" target="external">BevShots</a>, based in Tallahassee, Florida, produces colorful images of wine, liquor and beer magnified up to 1,000 times. The company sells them to buyers as works of art. "Each image is a picture of beverage crystals taken through the lens of a polarized light microscope," said Lester Hutt, the company's president. A photograph of scotch is shown here.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    To form the crystals, Hutt said drops of a beverage are placed on a glass microscope slide to dry out. As the cocktail dries, the ingredients and impurities form crystals. To find crystals beautiful enough to use as art, Michael Davidson, the scientist who shot the images, often creates more than 200 slides of the same drink. A close-up image of American light beer is photographed here.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    Depending on the difficulty of crystallizing a beverage, Hutt said the process can take anywhere from four weeks to more than six months. Red wine crystals are captured in this image.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    The colors may look like they're manipulated by photo-editing software. But Hutt said they are real as real can be. As the polarized microscope light passes through the crystals, the light is refracted and creates a rainbow. The many colors of Mexican beer are show here.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    The variation in color and shape comes from the composition of the crystals, Hutt said. Some mixed cocktails, such as Pina Colada (shown here), contain a lot of sugar, which forms crystals differently than liquors like vodka which have fewer impurities, he said.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    Just like snowflakes, Hutt said, no two beverage crystals are exactly the same. An up-close-and-personal view of vodka is shown here.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    Who knew each drop of a refreshing cola could look like this?
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    Next time you take a shot of tequila, remember that this is what it looks like when you zoom in.
    Courtesy Bevshots
  • Science Turns Cocktails Into Works of Art

    A microscopic view of a glass of bubbly is shown here.
    Courtesy Bevshots
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