Courtesy Donna Carr
  • Polar Bears

    Deep in the Canadian tundra, a mother polar bear takes her newborn cubs out into the world for the first time. It's a rare sight that only about 200 people are believed to have experienced up close. "Emerging from the den, she's introducing them to the world," said polar bear tracker Morris Spence.
    Courtesy Donna Carr
  • Polar Bears

    The cubs are very playful on their first day out, running and playing with their mother. Although they look like cute fluffballs, being this close to cubs can be dangerous. "We've got to be very careful when we're looking for bears around here," Spence said. "They'll pull you back down and that'll be the end of you."
    Courtesy Linda Drake
  • Polar Bears

    ABC News' Neal Karlinsky and Scott Shulman joined up with some of the world's leading wildlife photographers to track these rare newborn polar bear cub sightings. The group was a few hours outside of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. It's one of the most remote and inhospitable places on earth.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    One their first day, they spent eight hours in the ice and snow before they were able to capture the first glimpse of the black nose of a polar bear cub. At 40 degrees below zero, the group had to pile on the outerwear. Photographer Linda Drake, shown here, began to grow ice crystals on her face.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    Drake explained that on her first year of shooting out here, she lost the tip of her finger to frostbite, but she said it was worth it. "It's just a very special place," she said. "The bears, for me, are very special."
    Courtesy Linda Drake
  • Polar Bears

    Polar bears travel to this remote part of Canada every November to bear their young deep inside snow caves. They will emerge just before spring for a 40-mile trek back to the Hudson Bay, where this mother and her cubs will find their first solid food -- seals.
    Courtesy Donna Carr
  • Polar Bears

    The group calls upon the help of Cree Indian trackers to look for footprints and other signs of polar bears.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    It is so cold that tracker Morris Spence's moustache completely froze after a day of looking for polar bears on his snowmobile. "It's always like that," he said, his face is full of frostbite burns.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    Spence explained that polar bears like to travel and don't always return to the same den spots. "When she wants to stop, she'll stop and rest and nurse...and then away they go again," he said.
    Courtesy Donna Carr
  • Newborn Polar Bear Cubs' First Day Out

    In this photo, one cub looks like he's in "time out." World Wildlife Fund polar bear researcher Pete Ewins is among the photographers looking for polar bears. He explained that climate change is deleting the sea ice these bears rely on for hunting. "These are the best-studied bears on the planet," he said. "Over half of them will die in the first year and it's that critical survival of the cubs that determines your recruitment into your population."
    Courtesy Linda Drake
  • Polar Bears

    The group uses converted vans that are souped-up with tank treads instead of wheels to cross the barren, icy landscape.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    While tracking polar bears, ABC News' Neal Karlinsky and Scott Shulman hunkered down with the group at the Wat'chee Lodge, hours outside of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. It's only open six weeks a year and space is limited. It's often packed with international wildlife photographers.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    View of a sunset from the Wat'chee Lodge, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada.
    ABC News/Scott Shulman
  • Polar Bears

    Right now these cubs are not much bigger than a miniature poodle, but as adults they can grow to weigh over a ton. In two years, these cubs will be on their own, and it's these rare sightings that give skeptics hope, including WWF polar bear researcher Pete Ewins. "They've got a great supply of warm milk and they've got a beautiful mom so life's all good so far," he said.
    Courtesy Linda Drake
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