Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    This remote-controlled arm, mounted on a wheeled platform, can send back sensation to its user with "haptic feedback." This means that if the arm hits a wall or the ground, the user -- at a secure location -- can feel the force of hitting the wall or the ground. Still in development by Harris Corporation, it would allow for Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians to have "human-like dexterity" and "human-like precision" to "surgically defeat the explosive device" and preserve forensic evidence, according to a representative.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    Another angle of the Harris Wireless Haptic Manipulation System, being used to stack small wooden blocks.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    The Terabot-S, developd by Oceaneering Space Systems, is a non-haptic, yet lower cost manipulator, at $30,000 -- not including the wheeled platform. The lower cost the manipulator, the more that can be ordered, said a representative from Oceaneering Space Systems.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    This light-weight, dual-armed robot with three fingers is designed for "military engineers who clear the routes of explosives, and for explosive ordnance disposal guys who go out there and disarm the bombs," according to HDT Robotics representative Kent Massey, director of advanced programs. Massey said the current arms being used by military robots are very simple, and aren't particularly strong. "They do the job right now," he said, "but this arm is much, much stronger."
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    About three feet in diameter, the "Guardbot," developed by DRS Defense Solutions, is an amphibious unmanned ground system equipped with two cameras that can feed back live video. The Guardbot can maneuver through snow, mud, sand and water by "rolling." The ball shape gives its two cameras a broader range of peripheral vision, said a representative. Instead of five guys standing guard in front of a building, he said, now there can be just the Guardbot, which, while unarmed, can alert those monitoring the video feed.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    Another angle of the Guardbot.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    This unmanned aerial system, Northrop Grumman's Fire Scout, is designed for intelligence surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR). A Northrop Grumman spokesperson said these systems are used for reconnaissance over Libya. One was shot down over Libya in June while conducting surveillance for NATO.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    While the Fire-X is also used for ISR, with its ability to haul more than 2,600 pounds internally or externally and its endurance of more than 15 hours, it could potentially carry a weapon, according to a spokesperson.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    The LapFEA Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) is about a foot tall and wide, can fly for four minutes at a time and can carry half a pound. "It provides a potential low cost alternative platform for the Armed Forces, in reconnaissance and pursuit of IEDs," said a fact sheet from the Swedish company.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    This unmanned ground system, built by 5D Robotics, is equipped with lasers that can sense and track moving objects. If programmed to, the system can follow a soldier, carrying heavy equipment and other objects. This one can be controlled by a video game console.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
  • Fighting IEDs: Latest in Unmanned Aerial and Ground Systems

    This unmanned ground system is developed by Northrop Grumman.
    Kristina Wong, ABC News
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