'I'm Shmacked': Are Students Seen Partying Online Hurting Job Prospects?

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He points to various examples his company found of people who had been passed over for jobs because of their online postings. One guy who posted a photo of himself passed out near a case of beer. Another posted about his drug sale and another made a menacing pose in a photo. Bourne said all three job applicants were rejected.

But Ray and his business partner Arya said alcohol-fueled gatherings are their bread and butter. Ray said he didn't think that exposing these students' antics in their YouTube videos would cause them trouble later.

"Of course they are online, they are in a video, they should know that," he said. "But it's a very slight chance that a specific employer would see them and judge them on a video of 'I'm Shmacked.'"

The duo expressed disbelief that potential employers would even care what is in the 'I'm Shmacked' videos.

"At this point, if they don't think we're drinking in college, that's a bit naïve," Arya said.

They also pointed out, and Bourne agreed, that while Facebook photos are tagged with names, making them easy to be discovered, there is no name-tagging in a YouTube video, so there is less risk that an employer will recognize someone.

"The people that I've seen in those 'I'm Shmacked' videos are hard to be identified unless their actual names are in there or they're tagged to their personal Facebook page," Bourne said.

On a stroll down frat row at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, several students who heard that 'Im Shmacked' was on campus said they were avoiding being caught partying on camera because it was "embarrassing."

"I wouldn't go on that video," one student said. "I wouldn't want future employers to see me out doing anything on that video, absolutely not."

Another student compared it to "Girls Gone Wild." Others thought the series was "awesome."

Now, partly because of "J's" discomfort with his video, Ray said he now edits out any images that could be construed as illegal, such as smoking marijuana. He said he also removes specific shots of people who ask him to.

But the "J" video has been out there so long now -- it was posted in 2010 and made when he was a freshman -- that both men agreed if there was harm to be done, it's been done already.

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