NASA/JPL
  • before after

    A false-color image of Haiti shows the fault that caused the earthquake as a straight line through the mountains, highlighted here with red arrows. The data for this image is ten years old – it was recorded by a radar array on the space shuttle Endeavour in February 2000. Scientists have known for decades that stress was building along the Plantain Garden fault that passes just a few miles south of Port-au-Prince.
    NASA/JPL
  • Haiti

    The damage caused by the magnitude 7.0 earthquake in Haiti Tuesday is almost too devastating to imagine. But aerial and ground photos of the country, especially the capital city Port-au-Prince, provide a window into this recent natural disaster. Google and the aerial imaging company GeoEye released new images that show some of the hardest-hit areas before and after the earthquake. The photo on top shows Port-au-Prince in March 2008, the photo below shows the same area after Tuesday's earthquake.
    Google/GeoEye
  • Haiti

    Haiti's National Palace in Port-au-Prince is shown in this 2004 photo, top, and in a photo taken Jan. 13, 2010, bottom, after the earthquake struck.
    Department of National Defence, Cpl. Matthew McGregor, above,The United Nations, Logan Abassi, below
  • Haiti

    On the <a href="http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/" target="external">Google LatLong blog</a> maintained by the Google Earth and Maps Team, the company said it has been working with GeoEye to make sure their most recent satellite imagery of Haiti, taken at about 10:27 a.m. ET Wednesday, is available for relief organizations and users of Google Earth. This image shows a field in 2008, top, and this week, bottom. The bottom photo appears to show people who have taken refuge in the field after the earthquake.
    Google/GeoEye
  • Haiti

    A section of Port-au-Prince in 2008, top, and post-earthquake, bottom.
    Google/GeoEye
  • Haiti

    Tuesday's earthquake, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an epicenter of 9 miles below the surface, is considered the worst one to hit Haiti in 240 years. Among the crumbled buildings it left in its wake is the one shown here in 2008, top, and this week, bottom.
    Google/GeoEye
  • Haiti

    Haiti's Stade Sylvio Cator sports arena is shown in 2008, top, and this week, bottom. A group of Haitians appears to have taken refuge there.
    Google/GeoEye
  • Haiti

    A Haitian neighborhood in 2008, top, and again this week after the earthquake, bottom.
    Google/GeoEye
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