Salvage Mission to Enter Titanic's Hull

The Florida company

that owns the salvage rights to the Titanic is launching an

expedition this week that will attempt for the first time to

recover artifacts from inside the wrecked ocean liner.

“There is incalculable value down there and we are determined to recover as much as possible,” RMS Titanic Inc. chief executive Arnie Geller said in a statement.

The Clearwater-based company has made five salvage missions to the Titanic since the wreckage was discovered 2 1/2 miles beneath the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Newfoundland in 1985.

Vehicles Will Enter Famous Ship

Several thousand artifacts including pieces of the ship and personal items from passengers and crew members have been recovered and put on exhibit in several cities around the world. All of those items were recovered from a half mile field of debris outside the ship.

This expedition, which is scheduled to leave this week from Norfolk, Va., plans to use remote controlled cameras and vehicles to enter the ship’s cargo holds and mail room to look for jewelry and other valuable items.

Dives are planned through August. The salvage ship will be joined by British and Russian ships in the mission.

No Auction

“We do expect to yield a lot of high profile artifacts that will surely deteriorate if we don’t protect them,” Geller said. “And our mission is to preserve the historic items we recover and, consistent with the company policy, no items will be auctioned.”

The only items the company has sold from the Titanic are tiny pieces of coal used to power the ship.

The Titanic was the largest and most luxurious ocean liner in the world when it was completed in 1912. It sank on its maiden voyage from Britain to New York when it hit an iceberg on April 14, 1912, killing 1,500 passengers and crew. About 750 others were rescued.

Interest in the Titanic exhibits increased after the 1997 movie about the disaster set box office records and won the Academy Award as the best film of the year.

The company’s stock is traded on the U.S. over-the-counter market and the Frankfurt Stock Exchange.

Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine