Geithner's Great Risk: 'We Do Too Little, Not That We Do Too Much'

According to previous estimates there was roughly $32 billion left in the government's financial rescue plan. Asked by Stephanopoulos where the extra $100 billion came from, Geithner explained, "Less is out the door, but in terms of, if you look at what's not committed yet, it's roughly, you know, $135 billion... That estimate includes a judgment, a very conservative judgment about how much money is likely to come back from banks, that are strong enough not to need this capital, now, to get through a recession. But that's a reasonably conservative estimate. And it gives us -- and this is very important -- substantial resources to move ahead with this broad-based suite of initiatives to help get the financial system back in the business of providing credit."

However, Geithner did not close the door on the possibility that the administration will go back to Congress for another round of TARP funding. "We have substantial resources. We're going to use them quickly, as carefully as we can, make sure they're diverted to things that are going to get credit flowing again. And we'll cross that bridge when you come to it, in terms of whether we need additional resources," he explained. "And, of course, if we come to that point, we'll go to the Congress and give them the strongest case possible and help them understand why this would be cheaper over the long run, for us to move aggressively."

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