'This Week': Roundtable on Malaysia

Matthew Dowd, Michael Eric Dyson, Bill Kristol, Katrina vanden Heuvel and Greta Van Susteren on the Malaysia Air mystery.
3:00 | 03/16/14

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Transcript for 'This Week': Roundtable on Malaysia
Quick, final thoughts from the roundtable. Actually, they're talking already. I want to bring it back to the Malaysian flight mystery. Matthew dowd, this is a rare situation, where the entire world is watching. And it's a true, true mystery. Almost believe that can't be possible anymore. Well, it's captivating. And I think it's a sign of a lot of things. We love a mystery. The country and the world loves a mystery. But it's also in contrast to what we've seen in the last ten years. NSA, and what we have with the spying. Everybody knows everything. Google, all of that. And here, we have a plane, a 777, with 239 people aboard, disappear. Off all of the radars and we can't seem to find it a week or eight days. And it really does -- we thought the world was small. The world is big and mysterious. It's terrifying because many of us do fly. We do board the planes. We're all worried. We're consumed with it, could this happen to my plane? It's so bizarre. And we see how even, the united States, we were unable to get Malaysia to get us in there fast enough. And the trail gets colder. It shows about how the investigation needs to move fast. And we need to have a little more world cooperation. Yeah. It's -- that was a hit at the theaters. This particular conundrum, paradox, this is fascinating because we do fly. We feel vulnerable. And the knowledge limit. We think we know everything. The military has pings there. It suggests that the absorption of knowledge is an interesting one here. We have to use that, not only for spying on other people, but for figuring out natural catastrophes. In my household, George, I have to admit, we've been transfixed by one thing, that's Ukraine. If there is a new cold war, there are not going to be winners, only losers. Especially Ukraine. We need less bluster, more realism. We only have ten seconds left. Do you take hope from the announcement of perhaps a truce this morning? I think there's negotiation that can be done. And happy St. Patrick's day. For all of the Irish people out there and want to be Irish. Happy birthday to my mother today? We have a line. Erin go braugh. That's all we have time for today. Thank you, all, very much. We end on welcome news. There were no deaths of any service members in Afghanistan reported this week. We want to let you know that ESPN Nate silver is back. Fivethirtyeight.com. It's a unique blend of politics, sports and culture. It launches around 1:00 P.M. Tomorrow. Look for that tomorrow on abcnews.com. And thanks for spending part of your Sunday with us. Check out "World news" with David Muir tonight. And I'll see you tomorrow on "Gma." ]

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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