'This Week' Transcript: Gen Peter Chiarelli

SEVEN MONTHS LATER, ROHDE AND HIS AFGHAN COLLEAGUE MADE A DARING, MIDDLE-OF-THE-NIGHT ESCAPE AS THEIR CAPTORS SLEPT, USING A ROPE TO SCALE THE WALLS OF THEIR COMPOUND AND MAKE THEIR WAY TO SAFE HAVEN AT A NEARBY PAKISTANI MILITIA BASE.

WE'RE JOINED NOW BY DAVID ROHDE AND HIS WIFE KRISTEN MULVIHILL [MULL-VEE-HILL], WHOSE NEW BOOK "A ROPE AND A PRAYER: A KIDNAPPING FROM TWO SIDES" SHOWS THE IMPACT OF WAR ON THEIR FAMILY THROUGH DAVID'S HARROWING SEVEN-MONTH, TEN-DAY CAPTIVITY.

AMANPOUR: I actually want to ask you why you decided to write it in the he-said/she-said narrative.

DAVID ROHDE, CO-AUTHOR, "A ROPE AND A PRAYER": We thought it was important to show both sides of the story. And, you know, we got this attention, but there are thousands of families in the military. There are diplomats, aid workers, all working overseas in Iraq, Afghanistan, in so many countries. And you don't see the other side of it.

And what Kristen went through is just as important, if not more important, to what I went through.

AMANPOUR: Well, David obviously got all of the attention.

KRISTEN MULVIHILL, CO-AUTHOR, "A ROPE AND A PRAYER": Yes.

AMANPOUR: What was it that you wanted to say about the spouse being at home?

MULVIHILL: Yes. I mean, I hope the story resonates beyond kidnapping. You know, there are military families that are separated from their loved ones for months at a time. And so I hope it resonates with anyone dealing with separation or in a position to make life and death decisions for a spouse when they're unable to do so for themselves.

And we just hope it personalizes the war, puts a personal face on the issue.

AMANPOUR: As for you, you are a professional. You are a photo editor.

MULVIHILL: Yes.

AMANPOUR: You are here working at Cosmopolitan magazine, while your husband was in captivity.

MULVIHILL: Exactly. And we kept the case out of the news, which was something the family felt very strongly about. We did not want it publicized. So I went about my daily activities at work as a photo producer.

AMANPOUR: Why did you decide to keep it out of the news? Did you -- why did The New York Time want to do that, David?

ROHDE: There was a general consensus among sort of security experts that when you're dealing with militants who want to defy Western opinion that sort of publicly pressuring them won't work, it will actually raise value. / If it's a government, if it's Iran, North Korea, go public. If it's a young militant, it doesn't help, it just raises the hostage's value.

AMANPOUR: And yet you recount that you did tell the militants that they could get money and prisoners released from Guantanamo.

ROHDE: I did. That was after…

AMANPOUR: On whose authority did you tell them that?

(LAUGHTER)

ROHDE: I -- it was an effort, frankly, to save our lives. I was very worried about the lives of my two Afghan colleagues. In past kidnappings, the first thing they did was kill an Afghan to create the pressure.

And one of the problems we saw in writing this is that some governments do pay. There have been a past case, an Italian journalist, five prisoners released. There were some Korean hostages. There were rumors of millions being paid for them.

But I was told an al Jazeera film crew was on the way. Some Arab militants are coming with them, and they're going to decapitate you. I then said, you can get money and prisoners for us.

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