'This Week' Transcript: Gen Peter Chiarelli

CHIARELLI: Well, the suicide, their numbers are, in fact, down from men. I mean, the majority of my suicides are definitely men.

One of the issues we're seeing with women is in child custody cases. And the fact that -- and we're seeing it in men, too. When an individual leaves, and many times divorces are a very, very ugly thing, with folks fighting back and forth to see who's going to keep the kids. And every state law is different, and we find women in certain situations in some states and men in some states where their absence for a deployment, the fact that they're out for 12 months, gives the other individual in that state an advantage in a child custody case.

And I get these e-mails all the time. We work as hard as we can to help soldiers understand what their rights are.

AMANPOUR: And we talk about health care rights. A report by Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America calls the disability claims system antiquated and deeply flawed and so that the V.A. benefits systems has a backlog of about a million benefit claims for all veterans and some waiting months, even years just to clarify their medical disability status.

What can be done to cut through this red tape for these people who have been fighting your wars?

CHIARELLI: First of all, the partnership we have with the V.A. today is better than it's ever been before. And I say a lot of that's because of General Retired Shinseki. He understands us, and we work very, very closely with him.

But the disability evaluation system is a World War II relic. It was designed for a whole different force coming out of World War II.

AMANPOUR: So when is it going to be fixed?

CHIARELLI: Not an all-volunteer force. Well, that -- Congress has been busy doing a whole bunch of other things.

AMANPOUR: But when should it be fixed?

CHIARELLI: Well, we need to fix it right now. We need to take this one on. We need to understand that a volunteer army is totally different from the Army we had in World War II, that it is a totally different kind of soldier in today's Army and throughout the services, and we've got to fix that system.

AMANPOUR: General Chiarelli, thank you so much for joining us.

CHIARELLI: Thank you.

AMANPOUR: Appreciate it.

(FILE VIDEO) WHITFIELD: Breaking story out of Afghanistan. CLAIBORNE: A daring escape. A 'New York Times" reporter David Rohde was abducted more than seven months ago. WHITFIELD: David Rohde. MUIR: David Rohde of the New York Times vanished in the forbidding mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Tonight, he is a free man. (06/20) CLAIBORNE: This weekend he managed to get away from his captors. WHITFIELD: He found his way to a Pakistani army scout, was able to get help and now we understand, according to the "New York Times" reporting that he is at an American base in Bagram.

AMANPOUR: THOSE BREAKING NEWS REPORTS CAME IN JUNE 2009, AFTER PULITZER PRIZE WINNING NEW YORK TIMES REPORTER DAVID ROHDE ESCAPED FROM TALIBAN CAPTIVITY.

IN NOVEMBER 2008, ROHDE HAD BEEN REPORTING FROM AFGHANISTAN, WHEN HE AGREED TO AN IN-PERSON INTERVIEW WITH A TALIBAN COMMANDER OUTSIDE OF KABUL.

BUT THE PLANNED INTERVIEW TURNED INTO AN AMBUSH, AS ROHDE WAS KIDNAPPED AND TAKEN TO THE VOLATILE BORDER REGION OF NORTH WAZIRISTAN IN PAKISTAN, A TALIBAN AND AL QAEDA STRONGHOLD.

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