Fotolia/Studio Pookini
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    A new book, <a href="http://us.dk.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780756659202,00.html?strSrchSql=where+to+go+when/Where_to_Go_When:_Great_Britain_&_Ireland_DK_Publishing" target="external">"Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland</a>," provides stunning images and details outdoor activities, family getaways and festivals on the two isles. Here is a look at Newcastle in northeast England, on the banks of the River Tyne. The Romans might have been the first to build a bridge on the river, and today tourists and locals flock to the Gateshead Millennium Bridge, a pedestrian and cyclist bridge that actually tilts to allow boats to pass.
    Fotolia/Studio Pookini
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    In eastern England, the <a href="http://www.cleywindmill.co.uk/" target="external">Cley Windmill</a> offers visitors a chance to sleep in an early 18th century windmill with views over salt marshes.
    iStockphoto/whitemay
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    In Cornwall, <a href="http://www.speedsailuk.com/" target="external">Speedsail UK</a> offers visitors the chance to go blokarting, or land sailing. Tourists can fly across the beaches in a wheeled vehicle powered by the wind. Call it a sailboat for those who can't swim.
    iStockphoto/Bjorn Hotting
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    The Shetland Islands, 100 miles off the northern coast of Scotland, provide the perfect winter spot to witness the northern lights, or aurora borealis. These remote islands have very little urban light pollution to interfere with the show in the sky.
    iStockphoto/Roman Krochuk
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Kilmore Quay is a picturesque little village with thatched cottages and is one of the main fishing ports in southeast Ireland. June and July are good months to take a boat trip to the Saltee Islands, which make up one of Ireland's largest bird sanctuaries, home to thousands of cormorants, puffins, gannets and other birds, as well as seals.
    iStockphoto/Brian Kelly
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Laying far out in the Atlantic, off the western tip of Cornwall, the unpolluted and unspoiled Isles of Sicily don't really feel like part of England. There are virtually no cars on the smaller islands, and no one locks their front doors. The Bishop Rock lighthouse sits at the westernmost point of the islands.
    iStockphoto/Stephen Rees
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Mull, a 45-minute ferry ride from the northwest coast of Scotland, has miles of heather moorland, azure seas and picture-postcard villages. Sea eagles soar above a rugged coastline where crags and rocky headlands are interspersed with coves of pristine white sand.
    iStockphoto/John Butterfield
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    On the far-flung Orkney Islands stand the Stones of Stenness, one of the earliest recorded stone circles dating from about 3,100 B.C. Five of the original 12 stones remain, the tallest standing 20-feet high.
    iStockphoto/Iain Sarjeant
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Taking to the water on Britain's historic canal network gloriously uncomplicates your lifestyle for a week or so. And in the heat of summer it can provide the perfect relaxation fix. The boat is your home, your kitchen and your entire life while the rest of the world glides effortlessly by. Here is Bridgewater Canal in Walton.
    iStockphoto/Jonathan Maddock
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    If you are a bit more land-based, consider a stroll through one of the many vibrant poppy fields.
    iStockphoto/Rachel Dewis
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Brecon Beacons National Park is southeast Wales is a superb winter escape. Hewn from sandstone, the snow-dusted Beacons rise skyward to the twin high points of Pen y Fan and Cribyn. These summits can be treacherous in winter, especially their sheer cliff-like edges.
    iStockphoto/fotoVoyager
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Beaches empty of summer visitors, swells rolling in from the North Atlantic and the warmest waters of the year make fall the best time to hit the surf in North Cornwall. With plenty of surf schools and more than 80 surfing locations off magical bays and coves, this rugged coast is the perfect place to feed your surfing addiction.
    iStockphoto/Matthew Stansfield
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Scotland's best-loved native son is not a warrior or a king but a poet -- Robert Burns. People the world over ring in the New Year with his lyrics to "Auld Lang Syne." Much of his hometown of Alloway is now part of the Burns National Heritage Park, seen here from "Brig O'Doon," the medival bridge that spans the river Doon.
    iStockphoto/Thomas Dickson
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    The riverside village of Horning in the Norfolk Broads area of England offers miles of paths and boardwalks to hike or cycle and explore the country's largest protested wetlands.
    iStockphoto/David Joyner
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    Pure silence is so rare that when we experience it we are compelled to stop and listen to the quiet. One place to capture this elusive stillness is kayaking on the Norfolk Broads. Although the watery region attracts millions of visitors each year, its 120 miles of navigable lakes and gently moving rivers provide ample space to lose oneself and find those peaceful moments.
    iStockphoto/Ana Abejon
  • Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland

    <a href="http://us.dk.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780756659202,00.html?strSrchSql=where+to+go+when/Where_to_Go_When:_Great_Britain_&_Ireland_DK_Publishing" target="external">"Where to Go When: Great Britain & Ireland"</a> breaks down travel itineraries by season and six themes: History and Heritage; Wildlife and Landscape; Cities, Towns and Villages; Outdoor Activities; Family Getaways; and Festivals and Events. The book by DK Publishing costs $40.
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