Do It Yourself Winter Olympics: Ride the Bobsled

Brown, a former member of the U.S. national team, has spent 25 years as a bobsledder. Besides coaching the Jamaican team, he also coached the 2002 Greek bobsled team and is now coaching the first-ever South Korean bobsled team in the Vancouver Olympics.

Even after learning that Brown was going to be my driver, my heart was still racing and my breath was short. Maybe it was the excitement. Maybe it was just the thin air at 7,325 feet above sea level.

No, it wasn't the altitude. It was fear.

"This is probably one of the best tracks ever," Brown told me. "It's the speed. Most tracks you're building to speed and don't reach top speed until you get to the bottom. Here, by curve six, you're at top speed and it's pretty exciting."

A few final pointers and I was almost ready to go. Green advised the group to keep our shoulders up the whole time, to stop our heads from bobbing around. Also, if we could, we were told to push our elbows against the insides of the sled to stabilize ourselves.

"This will not be comfortable," he said. "The sleds are not built for comfort, they are built to go fast."

Thrilling Bobsled Ride Leaves Legs Shaking

So what was the actual ride like? It's hard to say. It was a bumpy 55 seconds of insane turns, speed and so much shaking that I couldn't see straight.

At moments I saw a turn ahead and felt us go into it, only to be instantly jerked the other way as the sled entered the next turn. It was better than any roller coaster I had ever been on.

At the end, slightly dizzy and confused, I stood up and was escorted out of the sled. A medical team was standing by in case me or one of my fellow passengers passed out.

We then had the chance to pose for photos ($3.99 for a digital one e-mailed up to $19.99 for an 8x10 autographed by the driver) leading one of my fellow passengers to mumble: "We're paying $200 and those are not included?"

I hobbled past the photos and climbed -- along with the bobsled -- into an open truck for the ride back to the top of the hill and my parked car. I walked away from the experience with a big smile on my face, a bit of a wobble and probably a better understanding of what it's like to be inside a washing machine during the spin cycle.

The Olympic Park in Utah offers the "Comet" bobsled rides for $200 a person. Reservations are required. Passengers need to be at least 16 years old and in good health. For more information, go to: http://www.olyparks.com/uop/rides.asp

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