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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    One World Trade Center, New York City (2013) - With the completion of its spire in May, this 1,776-foot building not only spiritually restored the New York City skyline, but also became the tallest structure in the Western Hemisphere.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Willis Tower, Chicago (1973) - One of the Windy City's most iconic tourist attractions, this 1,353-foot building contains "25 miles of plumbing, 1,500 miles of electric wiring, 80 miles of elevator cable, and 145,000 light fixtures," according to its website.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Trump International Hotel & Tower, Chicago (2009) - With 339 guestrooms and suites to choose from, travelers can enjoy waking up to unparalleled views from this 1,389-foot building.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Empire State Building, New York City (1931) - Soaring 1,250 feet above Manhattan, this Art Deco landmark celebrates various cultures and causes with multi-colored lighting displays on a near daily schedule.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Bank of America Tower, New York City (2009) - Certified Platinum LEED for being one of the world's most environmentally responsible high-rise office buildings, this 1,200-foot building conserves about 10.3 million gallons of water every year.
    Ryan Browne/Cook+Fox Architects/Wikipedia
  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    AON Center, Chicago (1973) - Standing 1,136 feet, the AON looks out over "the Bean" and other local landmarks. But there are surprises on the ground too: Rabbits routinely make homes in the planters of the AON Center grounds.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    John Hancock Center, Chicago (1970) - The black facade of this 1,128-foot structure gives it even more prominence within a mostly gray landscape.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Chrysler Building, New York City (1930) - Visitors can enter this 1,046 foot tall landmark straight from the subway. Then, head straight to the observation deck to enjoy 360-degree views of the city.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    New York Times Tower, New York City (2007) - Occupants of this 1,046-foot building can enjoy gearless "smart" elevators that transport them at 1,600 feet per minute.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Bank of America Plaza, Atlanta (1993) - The 23-karat gold leaf embellishing the spire of this 1,040-foot stunner brings a regal air to the Atlanta skyline.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    U.S. Bank Tower, Los Angeles (1990) - At 1,018 feet high, this building is the tallest in California and one of the most recognizable, often appearing in Hollywood movies and TV series set in Los Angeles.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    AT&T Corporate Center, Chicago (1989) - Spires, gables and points are just some of the architectural elements giving this 1,007-foot structure a true 90s-era aesthetic.
    TonyTheTiger/Wikipedia
  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    JP Morgan Chase Tower, Houston (1982) - This 75-story, 1,002-foot Houston skyscraper sets itself apart with its pentagonal shape.
    Reagan Rothenberger/Wikipedia
  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Two Prudential Plaza, Chicago (1990) - A super-tall skyscraper standing 995 feet high, this building features stacked chevron setbacks, a pyramidal peak, and an 80-foot spire.
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  • Tallest Buildings In The U.S.

    Wells Fargo Plaza, Houston
    Gabor Eszes/Wikipedia
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