Bradley Ambrose
  • Volcano Adventure

    Geoff Mackley is an extreme filmmaker, tackling typhoons in Korea and chasing cyclones in Samoa. Volcanoes are his favorite. He recently returned to Mt. Marum, an active volcano in Vanuatu, to film climbers getting closer to lava than humans have before. Here team member Drew Bristol, after rappelling into the crater, poses as lava churns behind him. Watch the full story on "Nightline."
    Bradley Ambrose
  • Volcano Adventure

    Getting to Ambrym, the island where Mt. Marum is located, requires taking a hair-raising hour-long helicopter ride. To get to the drop zone, where Mackley's team have set up ropes to rappel down into the crater, requires hiking up and down steep slopes right at the lip of the volcano. The volcanic sand is loose, so sure footing is never a guarantee.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    Visitors to Marum shouldn't expect sunny skies and warm breezes typical of the South Pacific. Marum creates its own micro-climate of dense cloud and whipping wind. Gas masks are essential to survive the sulphur dioxides gases that the volcano belches, burning your lungs and eyes.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    In this barren lunar landscape, adventure cameraman Geoff Mackley and his team of fellow Kiwis pitched their yellow tents, barely visible here, only a few yards away from the gas-spewing crater of Mt. Marum. As soon as there's a break in the weather, the team springs to the task at hand: filming people descending to the lava.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    Team Marum 2011 (from left): fixer Daniel Lacy, professional climbers Johno Smith and Drew Bristol, expedition leader and cameraman Geoff Mackley, photographer Bradley Ambrose.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    At night, the sky above Mackley's 'Camp Marum' is lit an otherworldly reddish orange by Mt. Marum's lava lake. "It's the most amazing place in the world," said climber Drew Bristol.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    Mackley has put his camera position right next to the sheer cliff face of the crater so he can film his team rappelling into it. Previous visits have brought him and his team close to the lava, but not to his goal: the bottom of the crater. He has returned, and has brought thousands of dollars of fancy equipment, to reach it -- and film what happens.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    Marum's is a forbidding landscape: no animals, no plants -- no life at all, except the raging lava and the few humans who come to witness it. This is Geoff Mackley's office. He embraces danger through his viewfinder, hence the title of his Discovery Channel show: "Dangerman."
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    ABC News Asia Producer Karson Yiu lies right on the edge of Mt. Marum's crater to get shots of the angry pit of molten rock below.
    Bradley Ambrose
  • Volcano Adventure

    The lava lake in Mt. Marum is one of only five in world, as far as we know. Its magma churns continuously at temperature of over 2,000 degrees Celsius. Descending to it requires wearing an oxygen tank and a specially designed suit that protects the wearer from the heat.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    Professional climber Drew Bristol, in a specifically designed heat-resistant suit, rappels toward Marum's pit to pose for Mackley's cameras. It's a 1,500-foot drop, straight down. Halfway down, the rocks get very sharp. The lava lake is about the size of two-and-a-half football fields. When you're up close, the noise is like the ocean's roar.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
  • Volcano Adventure

    "To get a shot of a human being looking like an ant on the lip of it -- that will show the awesome power of Mother Nature. That's the ultimate shot," said Mackley. The climber, Drew Bristol, descends farther, toward the lip: "There's no way I'd let anyone else come down here," he tells the team via radio.
    Karson Yiu/ABC News
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