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Photo copyright Flickr / Mike Sten. Text by Lena Katz, JustLuxe.com
  • Waterfalls

    The Bouma Waterfalls (also called Tavoro Falls) in Fiji's Bouma National Heritage Park on Taveuni Island are three separate falls, accessible by hiking from the park's visitor center three miles through the tropical forest. There are natural swimming holes beneath each waterfall.
    Photo copyright Flickr / Mike Sten. Text by Lena Katz, JustLuxe.com
  • Waterfalls

    One of Jamaica's iconic attractions, Dunn?s River Falls is a series of terraced waterfalls running 600 feet down to the sea. Climbing up the waterfall has become such a popular activity that the area is now a designated park where guides help visitors navigate the rocks and tumbling waters.
    Photo copyright Flickr/Kamakiri. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    East Coast locals fight summer heat by heading to one of the numerous natural swimming holes tucked around New England and New York State. One of the safest and most accessible is Warren Falls, the most popular swimming area on the Vermont's Mad River.
    Photo copyright Flickr/Binary Dreams. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    As you'd expect from a country largely covered by Amazon Jungle, Brazil has countless waterfalls?some of which are gentle and swimmable, like the one pictured above...
    Photo copyright Flickr/Fred Schinke. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    ...and then many which are NOT, like Cachoiera da Fumaca, a 1000-foot-high but very thin stream of water that's a several-kilometer hike above Riachinho. Many people hike to Fumaca just to see it, then back down to Riachinho to cool off.
    Photo copyright Flickr/Fred Schinke. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    To see the highest of the high falls, though, you need to go to Venezuela, where Salto Angel (Angel Falls, in English) holds the record at 3,212 feet-2,648 in a single high plunge, straight over the edge of Auyentepui Mountain.
    HandPhoto copyright Flickr/Neil Hinchley. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    North America has its own share of epic waterfalls. Most famous of all is Niagara Falls, which is actually comprised of three separate waterfalls. The two more powerful ones span the border between the USA and Canada: Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side and American Falls on the US. Both are much wider than they are tall.
    Photo copyright Niagara Falls, USA. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    If you want to see waterfalls in Yellowstone National Park, you?ll be spoiled for choice, but this fall is the big daddy of 'em all. It's actually the second drop that Yellowstone River waters must traverse-more than 300 feet down to enter the yellow rock Grand Canyon of Yellowstone.
    Photo copyright Wyoming Office of Tourism. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    All the power of the mighty Nile River is forced into one narrow 22 ft wide gorge to create a roaring cascade waterfall that's not high at all, but is forceful enough that the ground all around it trembles. Located in Murchison Falls National Park. Insider tip: Take a water safari with Paraa Safari Lodge, and boat past hippos and crocodiles, right up to the bottom of the falls.
    Photo copyright Paraa Safari Lodge. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    This image of Iceland's massive tiered waterfall Gulfoss sums up exactly what many people expect weather-wise from Iceland. In reality, this icy white landscape only exists a couple months out of the year. During warm months, Gulfoss is a magical misty tumble of water curtains, rushing rapids and rainbows. It is one of the most popular sights, and one third of the 'Golden Circle.'
    Photo copyright Visit Iceland. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    For as massive as this North Thailand waterfall is (918 feet high and nearly half as wide), the 30 tiers naturally formed from rocks and ledges, and the fanlike form of the gully it traverses, make the waters resemble delicate falls of lace. Located in Doi Inthanon National Park, about 90 minutes outside Chiang Mai.
    Photo copyright Thailand Tourism. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
  • Waterfalls

    A World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, this 5,600-foot wide curtain of water is also called 'The Smoke That Roars.' Insider tip: Stay at Tongabezi Lodge, which operates the only concession on Livingstone Island, and ask for a guide to take you to Devil?s Pool, site of a natural phenomenon.
    Photo copyright Flickr/Hiro 008. Text by Lena Katz, Just Luxe
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