Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    Don't expect to see your 787 look like this, especially after the recession. But Boeing is also marketing the plane as a high-end private or corporate jet. Thanks to lower cabin pressure, it will also be a more comfortable ride. Here, Boeing suggests a private bedroom with a queen-size bed for its high-end customers.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    This is what passengers are more likely to see. The interior of the Dreamliner is meant to be more airy and soothing. Sure it's not a private bedroom, but it looks more comfortable than any commercial jet out there now. The business class cabin is in the foreground with coach in the back.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    Here the Dreamliner undergoes final assembly at Boeing's Everett, Wash., facility. Visitors can pay to go on <a href="http://www.boeing.com/commercial/tours/index.html" target="external">a tour of the facility</a> and see the Dreamliner under construction.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    The parts for the Dreamliner are built at various factories around the world, which caused part some production delays. To get those enormous aircraft parts to assembly plants, Boeing had to create a new cargo jet it calls the Dreamlifter.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    Airlines that want to give up some seat space could choose to install fancy bars and lounges for high-paying customers. Given the downturn in air traffic, such lavish features might be on hold for a few years.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    For the corporate jet configuration, companies could install large dining room tables and seat configurations that allow people to face each other.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    First class customers on some airlines might find themselves with private bedrooms on the Dreamliner. While airlines have cut back on amenities for coach travelers, some are willing to splurge for first class flyers who can spend nearly $10,000 for a long-haul flight in one of these private cabins.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    Some of the Dreamliners are being assembled at Boeing's Everett, Wash., facility, which is the world's largest building by volume.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    The Dreamliner completed its ground tests during the weekend, including a 150-mph dash down the runway at Everett's Paine Field, during which its nose gear briefly lifted off the pavement.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    Here is the cockpit of the Boeing 777, the Chicago-based company's last new commercial aircraft, which entered service in 1995. It is the world's largest twin-engine jet and handles many of the international routes once flown by the 747.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    While the 787 could open up new direct international flights from smaller markets, it really is the Boeing 737 that recently has revolutionized air travel, allowing start-up airlines to fly new routes. Discount airline Southwest, which has the most domestic routes, only flies the 737. Here, small carrier Fly Dubai is using a 737.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    To fill its delayed 787 orders, Boeing has started to build a second Dreamliner assembly line in South Carolina and will continue to produce them at the higher-wage site in Washington state.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
  • Boeing 787

    The Everett facility also assembles several other jets, including the 747 seen here.
    Copyright 2009 The Boeing Company
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