Asiana Airlines Crash Victim Possibly Hit By Rescue Vehicle

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"Our pilots go through simulation training and complete their training process before flying to the airport. So I don't think that that problem (of the pilot being inexperienced) exists," he said.

There were four pilots on the plane due to the length of the trans-Pacific flight, according to Hersman. She said it is typical to have two pairs of pilots on long flights so that they can provide relief for rest.

Hersman did not know if all of the pilots were in the cockpit at the same time and said the four are being interviewed today.

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 was carrying 291 passengers and 16 crew members when it crashed Saturday at San Francisco International Airport. The tail was torn off as it crashed, and it burst into flames.

The crash of the Boeing 777 resulted in two deaths 181 injured people. Forty-nine patients are at area hospitals after surviving the crash. Eight patients remained in critical condition.

ABC News has learned that there were a few remaining passengers on board as the first of the fires broke out.

By the time the flames were out, much of the top of the fuselage had burned away. The tail section was gone, with pieces of it scattered across the beginning of the runway.

The flight's black boxes have been recovered and revealed the frantic moments seconds before the impact. Data on the black boxes showed that the pilots learned the plane was about to stall and tried to abort the landing seconds before it crashed on the runway, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said Sunday.

Analysis of the plane's recovered black boxes revealed that the control yoke shook in the pilot's hand about four seconds before the plane crashed, Hersman said. The pilots then attempted a "go-around" to abort the landing, less than two seconds before the plane hit the runway.

The jetliner was traveling at a speed "significantly" below the target speed of 137 knots (about 157 mph), but Hersman would not indicate how much slower the plane was traveling.

ABC News' David Muir, Matt Hosford and Dean Schabner contributed to this report.

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