Endangered Tigers: Resources on How to Help

Two of three tiger cubs born recently at Bali Zoo.
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From abandoned baby orangutans to endangered tigers in the wild, "Nightline" has brought you the touching stories of many animals and animal charities across the globe.

There has been an outpouring of comments from our viewers looking for ways to help. Below is a list based on recent stories.

Tigers: Cute Cubs at Bali Zoo Safe from Threats Killing Their Wild Cousins

The cubs in the "Nightline" story are Bengal tigers. The Sumatran tiger is the only subspecies of the big cat remaining in Indonesia after the country's Javan and Bali subspecies went extinct in the 20th century. It is estimated that only 400 Sumatran tigers now survive in the wild.

It's estimated that only 3,200 tigers are left in the wild. The World Wildlife Fund hosts an ongoing "Save Tigers Now" campaign on its website that is accepting donations. Click here for more information.

Humans aren't natural prey for elephants and tigers, but in the Sundarban islands of West Bengal, India, an alarming number of people have been attacked by these wild beasts. Some experts believe environmental issues and a rapidly growing human population in the region are reducing their habitat and their natural food supply, and forcing them into villages.

Watch the full story on "Nightline."

Abandoned Baby Orangutan at the Houston Zoo:

A baby orangutan in Houston's zoo was rejected by her mother, but 50 surrogate human moms have stepped in to fill the void.

Watch the full story on "Nightline"

The bright-eyed baby, who hasn't yet been given a name, was born to an orangutan named Kelly a bit more than a month ago, but the mother stopped feeding and caring for the baby shortly thereafter. Zoo staffers stepped in to give the baby round-the-clock care.

Click here to submit a name in the Houston Zoo's naming contest on their website and find out how to make a donation.

The "Born to be Wild" documentary showcases the conservation efforts of Birute Mary Galdika at her orangutan sanctuary in Borneo, Indonesia. For more information, visit the Orangutan Foundtain International website.

Orphaned Baby Elephants in Nairobi, Kenya:

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Nairobi, Kenya, is a charity started in 1977 to protect the lives of orphaned elephants and rhinos in the wild. It is the world's first elephant orphanage, and 17 orphaned baby elephants call it home. Keepers become surrogate parents.

Watch the full story on "Nightline"

The trust is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Nairobi and tourists pay a small fee to watch the mid-day feeding. Supplemented by a foster care plan run through the group's website, these viewings help cover the $1,000 per month it costs to maintain each baby elephant.

Click here to learn more at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.

Animals in Peril After Japan Tsunami

Several dogs, cats, horses and other animals have been found in the rubble or drifting among ocean debris in the wake of the 9.0-magnitude earthquake that struck Japan last month.

Watch the full story on "Nightline."

Many that have survived have been displaced from their owners or are not being accepted at shelters. Several animal organizations have pitched in to help and here are a few accepting donations:

PETA's Emergency Animal Fund -- helps all animals in need after natural disasters.

Search Dog Foundation -- deploying canine disaster search teams to help with recovering victims.

ABC News' Edward Lovett contributed to this report.

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