Face-Eating Attack Possibly Prompted by 'Bath Salts,' Authorities Suspect

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Citing an "imminent threat to public safety" the U.S Drug Enforcement Agency banned in 2011 for a year the possession and sale of three chemicals used to make the drug as they determine how best to combat the growing problem.

Although they resemble the types of salts people put in their bathtubs, the chemical make-up is different and has allowed peddlers to skirt the authorities. It can be either inhaled or snorted. It is less expensive than cocaine or ecstasy and is made in kitchens and is not that expensive.

Patients on the drug can experience high body temperatures that induce hypothermia, paranoia, hallucinations, and agitation. There is no test available yet for the substance, and because the drug is so new it's unclear if it is addictive.

"This is new to us. I remember years ago when I worked narcotics when crack first came out seeing people with rocks and not knowing what it was," says Aguilar. "We are facing the same problem. Aguilar said the cop who confronted and shot Eugene was traumatized by the incident.

A witness was also shaken by what he said.

"When I looked forward, there's a guy on top of another person, eating him and tearing him apart," said Larry Vega to WPLG who witnessed the attack while on a leisure bike ride. Vega says he went to a Miami police officer and told the officer what was going on and that there was blood everywhere.

"I never thought I would see someone eating someone else. It was really, really horrific. He was tearing it up and just throwing it away," Vega said.

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