May 21, 2011, and Other 'Judgment Days' That Have Come and Gone

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7 'Judgment Days' That Have Come and Gone

3. Jehovah's Witnesses first anticipated the end of times in 1914, now noting on their official website that "not all that was expected to happen in 1914 did happen, but it did mark the end of the Gentile Times and was a year of special significance."

4. In the century before, renowned New England Baptist minister William Miller triggered what ultimately became known as the "great disappointment" after his failed prophesies that Christ would return sometime between March 21, 1843, and March 21, 1844, and then on Oct. 22, 1844.

5. More recently, Pastor John Hinkle of Christ Church Los Angeles told a Trinity Broadcasting Network audience that the "most cataclysmic experience that the world has ever known since the Resurrection ... is going to happen," according to the Christian Research Institute, which is home to "Bible Answer Man."

Hinkle said God, "in the most awesome voice," told him that "on Thursday, June the ninth [1994], I will rip the evil out of this world."

You might have missed it, however, because the prophesy came to pass invisibly, he said, according to the Christian Research Institute.

6. Chuck Smith, the prolific author and senior pastor of Calvary Chapel Costa Mesa in California, turned to scripture and simple math to prepare his flock for the Tribulation. "If I understand Scripture correctly, Jesus taught us that the generation which sees he 'budding of the fig tree,' the birth of the nation Israel, will be the generation that see the Lords return," he wrote in his book "End Times" (1978). "I believe that the generation 1948 is the last generation. Since a generation of judgment is forty years and the Tribulation period lasts seven years, I believe the Lord could come back for His Church any time before the Tribulation starts, which would mean any time before 1981. (1948+40-7=1981)."

"I could be wrong," he wrote in "Future Survival" (1978), "but it's a deep conviction in my heart, and all my plans are predicated upon that belief."

Smith was wrong and has not only abandoned his prophesying ways but since has looked askance at others who have gone down that road.

"The Jehovah's Witnesses, for example, thought the world was sure to end in 1914," Smith wrote in his book "Dateline Earth: Countdown to Eternity" (1989). "When it didn't happen, they merely moved the date up a few years."

7. The prophetic-sounding year 2000 inspired too many doomsday predictions to list here. Suffice it to say that, in hindsight, there was really no need to party like it was 1999.

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