MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Roadbed excavations along Park Avenue during the preliminary construction of Grand Central Station in New York City in 1908.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    An exterior view of Grand Central Station, circa 1904. Grand Central Depot served three railroads: the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, the New York and Harlem Railroad, and the New York and New Haven Railroad. In 1900 the depot was expanded and renamed Grand Central Station.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The original plans for Grand Central Terminal in New York in 1903 called for a building above the station which would serve as a hotel or office building. Basic steel work was included in the construction of the terminal, though this design for the building was not used.
    AP Photo
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Grand Central Terminal Head House under construction in 1912. The building is surrounded by scaffolding, some of the facade is still being added, and the lower levels are open to view. It took ten years of excavation and construction to complete the station.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Interior view of the Grand Central Terminal main concourse before its opening in 1913, taken from the west balcony. The zodiac mural on the ceiling is sketched in but unfinished.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    A worker carves a statue of Mercury, Minerva, and Hercules on the south facade.
    Corbis
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The facade of Grand Central Terminal is seen in 1913.
    Corbis
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Pedestrians and cars fill 42nd Street below as cars drive around the station on an elevated section of Park Avenue. It goes around Grand Central Terminal's second floor to alleviate congestion, 1930s.
    FPG/Getty Images
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The luxurious 20th Century Limited carried passengers from Grand Central to Chicago for 65 years, from 1902 to 1967, sometimes called "the world's greatest train." It is seen here circa 1935.
    Imagno/Getty Images
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The main concourse of Grand Central Terminal with light shining through the windows, in a picture from 1927 or 1928.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Park Avenue looking north to Grand Central Terminal, from around 39th Street. The Pan Am Building (now MetLife) was constructed in 1962, to replace a six-story office building behind the terminal, and officially opened in March of 1963.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The clock in front of the Grand Central Terminal South Facade is surrounded by sculptures of Minerva, Hercules, and Mercury, designed by French sculptor Jules-Felix Coutan. Unveiled in 1914, it was considered to be the largest sculptural group in the world.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    The famous four-faced clock on top of the information booth is a common meeting place, and perhaps the most recognizable icon at Grand Central.
    Kathy Willens/AP Photo
  • Grand Central Marks 100 Years

    Grand Central Terminal?s main concourse during the morning rush.
    MTA/Metro-North Railroad
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