Steve Mankin
  • Aaron Mankin

    Cpl. Aaron Mankin was 23 years old when he deployed to Iraq in March 2005. That May, the vehicle he was traveling in rolled over an improvised explosive device and exploded. Four Marines died in the attack and 11 others were injured. Mankin said he was thrown back and new he was on fire.
    Steve Mankin
  • Aaron Mankin

    While deployed, Mankin worked as a combat correspondent, cataloguing the events that his unit experienced. Mankin shown here standing on a bridge going into Fallujah in 2005.
    Steve Mankin
  • Aaron Mankin

    This shot is one of Mankin's favorites, and was taken while he was at Fort Meade, Md., for his MOS training in 2004.
    Steve Mankin
  • Soldier on Healing Wounds, Finding Hope Again

    Mankin survived the blast, but his injuries were gruesome. His ears, nose and mouth were so badly burned that they were essentially gone; he lost two fingers on his right hand.
    Steve Mankin
  • aaron mankin

    Dr. Timothy Miller, UCLA's chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery, examined Cpl. Aaron Mankin prior to surgery on Oct.1, 2007. Miller and his surgical team donated their services to help rebuild Mankin's burned body.
    Courtesy of Reed Hutchinson/UCLA Medical Center
  • Aaron Mankin

    In this undated photo, Mankin plays with his then-8-month-old daughter, Madeline. "My worst fear for her as she grows up is that she will be ridiculed or teased for the way I look," he told ABC News. He and his wife, Marine Lance Corp. Diana Kavanec, were married in 2006 but have since divorced.
    Steve Mankin
  • Aaron Mankin

    The intense burns Mankin suffered left him severly disfigured and he had nearly 30 surgeries at the military's premier burn treatment facility, Brooke Army Medical Center in Houston, Texas. Just two months after his injuries, Mankin was presented with the Purple Heart.  He is shown here with his father Steve Mankin and Col. Brian Smallwood.
    Steve Mankin
  • Aaron Mankin

    Mankin, pictured here in his dress blues in August 2007. Even though he has become accustomed to his face in the last few years, he says the chance to have it repaired has given him a newfound hope, and his mission now is to give other soldiers who have suffered similar burn injuries the hope that they too can recover. Mankin attends the Woodruff Foundation's "Stand Up for Heroes" event on Nov. 8
    Steve Mankin
  • Soldier Finds Hope Again

    Aaron Mankin, right, is shown here with his mother and Bruce Springsteen at the Woodruff Foundation's annual "Stand Up For Heroes" event at the Beacon Theater in New York City on Nov. 8, 2012. Mankin has undergone 29 surgeries since his accident in Iraq.
    Bartley Price/ABC News
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