Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    World War II Army Air Force Sgt. Dominick Licari, 31, vanished March 13, 1944, after his bomber crew didn't return to base in what's now Papua New Guinea. Officials found his remains last year at the crash site and he was buried this summer in Frankfort, N.Y., after dental records and DNA verification, the <a href="http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/news/news_releases/">Defense Department</a> said.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Missing since December 1950, Army Cpl. Marvin E. Omans, 20, who fought in the Korean war, was buried this summer in Little Rock, Ark., after North Koreans turned over boxes believed to contain the remains of 200 to 400 U.S. troops. Some of them appeared to be from the area where Omans was last seen before what was left of the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT) succumbed to enemy forces.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Missing since December 1950, Army Cpl. Glyndon E. Moyer, 18, was buried this summer in his hometown of Luray, Va. His remains were in boxes the North Koreans turned over between 1991 and 1994; they were believed to contain the remains of 200 to 400 U.S. troops. Moyer was last seen before what was left of the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT) succumbed to enemy forces.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Korean War Army Master Sgt. Olen B. Williams, 37, was buried June 9 in Clanton, Ala.; he was reported missing in action in late 1950. He and elements of the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT) came under attack near a small village in Sinhung-ni, North Korea. His remains were among those the U.N. and Communist forces exchanged in 1954, but required technological advances to identify, in 2012.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Korean War Army Pfc. James Constant's remains were exhumed after first being declared "unidentifiable" in 1955 and buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii. Analysts decided in 2012 that advanced technology should be used on those remains found near Changnyong, South Korea, where Constant and others died. He was buried properly in Indianapolis this spring.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Korean War Army Lt. Col. Don C. Faith Jr., 35, of Washington, Ind., was buried this spring in Arlington National Cemetery; he died of injuries sustained Dec. 2, 1950, when he took command of the 31st Regimental Combat Team in North Korea. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor before a U.S.-Korean team found his remains in 2004.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Korean canvassers located humans last year near the town of Chochiwon, where Army Master Sgt. Earnest W. Grainger, 28, of Conway, S.C., had gone missing during an attack by North Korean forces. The military ruled his remains non-recoverable in 1956. But the DNA was later matched with his sister and nephew, and he was buried in his hometown in April.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Army Sgt. Charles Allen, 23, of Mineola, Texas, was captured near Ch'ongch'on River, North Korea, in 1950 and then marched to a POW camp. Fellow POWs buried him after he died March 31, 1951. His remains were among those exchanged in 1954 but buried as "unidentifiable" at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. In 2012 his remains were exhumed and buried this spring in Dallas.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Korean War Army Sgt. Raymond B. Wellbrock, 20, died in August 1953 from battlefield wounds and lack of medical treatment after being captured. Between 1991 and 1994, the North Koreans turned over 208 boxes of remains found in the area where Wellbrook was last seen. He was eventually identified, by DNA matched with his brother and sister, and buried in March in his hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Cpl. James R. Hare, 19, of Cumberland, Md., died of malnutrition in April 1951 in a POW camp in Suan County, South Korea, after Chinese forces attacked. Between 1991 and 1994, the North Koreans turned over 208 boxes of remains found in the area where Hare was last seen. He was eventually identified, by DNA matched with his brother and sister, and buried in February in Levels, W.Va.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    During a 1999 excavation, a U.S.-North Korean team found remains near the Ch'ongch'on River later identified as Army Sgt. Ervin A. Fricke, of Oakville, Wash. He was last seen Nov. 25, 1950, before the Chinese Army attacked his 9th Infantry Regimental. He was buried in February in Portland, Ore.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Pfc. Bobby L. Byars, 18, of Griffin, Ga., was reported missing after the 31st Regimental Combat Team engaged the enemy near Sinhung-ri, North Korea, Nov. 29, 2013. Between 1991 and 1994, the North Koreans turned over 208 boxes of remains found in the area where Byars was last seen. He was eventually identified with DNA matched with his brother, and buried in February in his hometown.
    Courtesy DPMO
  • Missing in Action but Hunt Not Always in Vain

    Army Pfc. Weldon A. Davis, 24, of Tioga, Texas, was last seen late November 1950 near Somindong, North Korea, where the 2nd Infantry Division suffered extensive casualties, and he was among men captured by the Chinese. He died the following year of malnutrition and pneumonia in a POW camp. He was buried in February in Dallas.
    Courtesy DPMO
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