AP Photo
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Pearl Harbor, a naval base on the southern coast of Oahu Island, Hawaii, is the headquarters for the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Ford Island, pictured here on Nov. 10, 1941, lies at the center. In 1941, it would become an important target for the Japanese.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku, commander of the Japanese Combined Fleet, planned the attack on Pearl Harbor. Six aircraft carriers transported hundreds of planes and launched the first attack wave, which included torpedo planes and bombers, less than 300 miles from the U.S. naval base.
    AP Photo
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The first bomber appeared over Pearl Harbor at 7:55 a.m. Here, a view from a Japanese plane shows a plume of water rising from the water.
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  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    A small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crewmember from the water after the surprise Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. In just over two hours, 18 warships and over 160 aircraft would be destroyed.
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  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Arizona's forward magazine explodes. The battleship sunk on December 7, 1941, after being hit by a 1,760 pound bomb.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Arizona begins to sink into the sea. The majority of the crewmembers aboard, over 1100 men, lost their lives as the ship sank in less than 10 minutes.
    AP Photo
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Shaw, a 1500-ton destroyer, was damaged during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The ship's forward magazines exploded, severing the bow and wrecking the bridge area.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Smoke rises from the burning buildings on Ford Island after the surprise attack by the Japanese that brought America into World War II on Dec. 7, 1941.
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  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Japanese planes carry out a bombing run on Wheeler Army Airfield, which was Hawaii's main fighter base, in central Oahu, on Dec. 7, 1941.
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  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    An aerial photo taken from a Japanese bomber shows Wheeler Army Airfield burning after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Nearly two-thirds of the 140 planes on the ground there were destroyed or damaged.
    Hulton Archive/Getty Images
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Sailors stand among wrecked airplanes at Ford Island Naval Air Station as they watch the explosion of the USS Shaw in the background, during the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941.
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  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Utah capsizes after being struck by three aerial torpedoes. The battleship was subsequently rolled over to clear the channel but left on the bottom.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The wrecks of the USS Downes and USS Cassin are shown after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Dec. 7, 1941.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Phoenix steams past the devastation on Battleship Row.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan, Dec. 8, 1941, after the surprise bombing of Pearl Harbor.
    AP Photo
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    The USS Oklahoma is righted, March 29, 1943, after the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. When the ship rolled over during the attack, it killed 429 men. It was eventually repaired, but sank during a storm in 1947.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Divers salvage a damaged ship at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in this undated photo.
    U.S. Navy Photograph/National Archives Collection
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Navy Rear Adm. Husband E. Kimmel, shown in this circa 1940 photo, served as commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was demoted from Admiral Operating to the rank of Rear Admiral in mid-December 1941 and retired from active duty in 1942.
    FPG/Archive Photos/Getty Images
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Members of the Naval Court of Inquiry, shown in this Oct. 1944 photo, exonerated Rear Adm. Kimmel for his role in the disaster and blamed Admiral Harold Stark, chief of naval operations, for failing to advise Kimmel. But in 1945, a Joint Congressional Committee Investigation found Kimmel and several others culpable.
    Handout
  • Anniversary of Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

    Army Maj. Gen. Walter Short, shown in this 1941 photo, was commander of the U.S. Army in Hawaii at the time of the Japanese attack. He was demoted from Lt. Gen. to Major General, and found culpable of the disaster, but decades later a Senate resolution declared both Short and Kimmel had performed their duties at Pearl Harbor "competently and professionally."
    MPI/Getty Images
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