Courtesy Dennis Jordan
  • Python Challenge in Florida Everglades

    Dennis Jordan displays a python he captured as part of the "Python Challenge" in the Florida Everglades. The Florida Python Challenge 2013 ended with the round up of a mere 68 snakes. Officials held the snake hunt because the pythons have multiplied into the thousands in the Everglades and have become a threat to native species.
    Courtesy Dennis Jordan
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    A Burmese python is displayed at the python hunt awards ceremony presented by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Feb. 16, 2013 at Zoo Miami. A public hunt for Burmese pythons in the Everglades yielded 68 of the invasive snakes, the longest measuring more than 14 feet long, Florida wildlife officials said.
    Peter Andrew Bosch/The Miami Herald via AP Photo
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    Florida Python Hunters, Ruben Ramirez, George Brana, Devin Belliston and Blake Russ pose with five of the pythons they captured during the Python Challenge in the Florida Everglades.
    Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post/ZUMAPRESS.com
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    A captured 13-foot-long Burmese python is displayed for snake hunters and the media before they headed out in airboats into the Florida Everglades for the Python Challenge on Jan. 17, 2013.
    J. Pat Carter/AP Photo
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    Bill Booth of Bradenton, Fla. stretches out a dead Burmese python he caught for students from the University of Florida to measure, in the Florida Everglades as part of the month long "Python Challenge" on Jan. 19, 2013.
    Wilfredo Lee/AP Photo
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    Bill Booth of Bradenton, Fla. wears a dead Burmese python he caught on Jan. 19, 2013 in the Florida Everglades as part of the month long "Python Challenge." Booth's snake measured an unofficial 11.59 feet.
    Wilfredo Lee/AP Photo
  • Python Parents: Fast Breeding Snakes Take Over Florida Everglades

    From Left to right, Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., Ron Bergeron, of the Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service Supervisor Ranger Al Mercado, and Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, hold a 13-foot python in the Everglades, Fla., Jan. 17, 2012. Salazar announced the ban on importation and interstate transportation of four giant snakes that threaten the Everglades.
    Alan Diaz/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    A Florida Keys python patrol officer holds a python during a training class at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge headquarters. The Everglades, one of the largest wetland systems in the world, is experiencing a python invasion. "They [pythons] were purposely brought here for commerce and now they are living well in the wild," Everglades National Park wildlife biologist Skip Snow said.
    The Nature Conservancy
  • Pythons

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, center, and Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., left, look at a 13-foot python held by National Park Service supervisor Ranger Al Mercado in the Everglades, Fla., on Jan. 17, 2012. The National Academy of Science report released Jan. 30, 2012, indicated that the proliferation of pythons coincides with a sharp decrease of mammals in the park.
    Alan Diaz/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    University of Florida researchers hold a 162-pound Burmese python captured in Everglades National Park, Fla. Therese Walters, left, Alex Wolf and Michael R. Rochford, right, held the 15-foot snake shortly after the python had eaten a 6-foot American alligator.
    Michael R. Rochford/University of Florida/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    A researcher holds a Burmese python near her nest in Everglades National Park, Fla. Pythons can live as long as 35 years and have anywhere from eight to 100 eggs. It's estimated that there are tens of thousands of pythons in the Everglades.
    Jemeema Carrigan/University of Florida/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    A Burmese python is wrapped around an American alligator in Everglades National Park, Fla. Biologists say they are most concerned about the survival of other animals in the park. According to the National Academy of Science report, the numbers of some medium-size animals have declined as much as 99 percent in some areas where pythons now lurk.
    Lori Oberhofer/National Park Service/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar helps National Park Rangers as they prepare to put a 13-foot python in a bag in the Everglades, Fla., Jan. 17, 2012. Salazar announced the ban on importation and interstate transportation of four giant snakes that threaten the Everglades.
    Alan Dia/AP Photo
  • Pythons

    Snake hunter Dave Leivman of Weston, Fla., shows a 9-foot python that he hunted in the Everglades, Fla., Jan. 17, 2012. "It's hard to put your finger on how many there are out there, but I would argue ... the acceptable number of pythons in the Everglades is zero," said snake hunter Jeff Fobb.
    Alan Diaz/AP Photo
  • Python Power: Snakes Take Over Everglades

    Rangers in the Florida Everglades made an alarming discovery in 2009 when they cut open this Burmese python and found she was pregnant with 59 babies.
    Everglades National Park/WENN.com
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