5 Things to Know This Morning

PHOTO: The entrance to the Cheesecake Factory restaurant in the John Hancock Center off Michigan Avenue is seen in this March 29, 2012, file photo in Chicago, Illinois.

Your look at the five biggest and most buzz-worthy stories of the morning.

1. 9 Worst Calorie Bombs at Chain Restaurants

For an average adult, the FDA recommends a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, with 20 to 35% of those calories coming from fat (that’s between 44 and 78 grams) and no more 7% coming from saturated fat (about 16 grams). You should also limit yourself to no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium and 25 grams of added sugar. Tell that to The Cheesecake Factory.

The restaurant chain just had three of its dishes earn “Xtreme Eating Awards,” handed out annually by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a nonprofit watchdog group that advocates for healthier foods for consumers. The awards, first handed out in 2007, (dis)honor chain restaurant menu items shockingly high in calories, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium.

2. Oscar Pistorius Dropped 'Baton of Truth,' Prosecutor Argues

Oscar Pistorius is back in court today, the start of closing arguments in the athlete’s murder trial.

Pistorius is charged in the Valentine’s Day 2013 shooting death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. Pistorius has argued that he mistook Steenkamp for an intruder, shooting her through the bathroom door. Prosecutors argue that he intentionally shot Steenkamp.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel discussed discrepancies in the athlete's testimony today, as well as perceived holes in the defense's case.

"We have two defenses, and we want the court to pick one," Nel said.

Nel referenced Pistorius' athletic endeavors in his closing arguments, comparing the trial to a relay race. Pistorius failed to hold onto the "baton of truth," leaving his outcome in doubt, Nel said.

Oscar Pistorius appears in a courtroom at his murder trial in Pretoria, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 7 2014.
Mujahid Safodien/AP pHOTO
Oscar Pistorius appears in a courtroom at his murder trial in Pretoria, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 7 2014.

3. Arrest Made in New Jersey Boy's Murder 23 Years Later

Investigators in New Jersey believe they've solved a 23-year-old cold case.

Michelle Lodzinski was arrested Wednesday in Martin County, Florida, and charged with the 1991 murder of her 5-year-old son, Timothy Wiltsey, according to the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office.

Lodzinksi, 47, told investigators her son disappeared at a carnival at Kennedy Park in New Jersey in May of 1991, police said. His partial remains were found in Raritan Center, an industrial park in Edison, New Jersey, in April the following year.

PHOTO: This photo released by the Martin County, Fla. Sheriffs Office shows Michelle Lodzinski and her son, Timothy Wiltsey, whose partial remains were found in 1992. Lodzinski, 47, was charged with her sons murder Wednesday, August 6, 2014.
Martin County Sheriffs Office
PHOTO: This photo released by the Martin County, Fla. Sheriff's Office shows Michelle Lodzinski and her son, Timothy Wiltsey, whose partial remains were found in 1992. Lodzinski, 47, was charged with her son's murder Wednesday, August 6, 2014.

4. Croc Takes on Shark During Epic Battle

An Australian tourist was left stunned after he witnessed a crocodile attempting to swallow a shark.

Andrew Paice, 43, was on a one-hour cruise on the Adelaide River in Australia when he spotted something unusual in the river.

“Earlier, we saw an 18-foot male crocodile known as Brutus leaping out of the water to eat a piece of buffalo meat held out on a pole to them,” Paice told ABC News via email.

PHOTO: Andrew Paice of Sydney, Australia photographed a crocodile nicknamed Brutus eating a live shark while on Adelaide River cruise on August 5, 2014.
Andrew Paice
PHOTO: Andrew Paice of Sydney, Australia photographed a crocodile nicknamed "Brutus" eating a live shark while on Adelaide River cruise on August 5, 2014.

5. Abraham Lincoln's Handwriting Found Inside a Library Book

For years, librarians at a small central Illinois library gossiped that a tattered book lying on one of its shelves justifying racism may have been in the hands of none other than Abraham Lincoln, the Great Emancipator.

On Tuesday, state historians confirmed that theory by announcing Lincoln's handwriting had been found inside the cover of the 700-page text, at the same time taking great pains to offer reassurance that the former president who ended slavery didn't subscribe to the theories at hand, but likely read the book to better educate himself about his opponents' line of thinking.

"Lincoln was worried that the whole idea that you could segregate one group of people based on some brand new thinking would just carry on into other realms," Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum Curator James Cornelius Tuesday said of Lincoln. "He could foresee the whole country coming apart over the issue that different people could be barred from different things based on different qualities."

PHOTO: This undated photo provided by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., shows what historical experts say is Abraham Lincolns handwriting they?ve found inside a tattered book.
AP Photo
PHOTO: This undated photo provided by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., shows what historical experts say is Abraham Lincoln's handwriting they?ve found inside a tattered book.

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