This Week's Best Quotes: 'I Got Mr. Obama Sitting Here and I Was Gonna Ask Him a Couple Questions'

PHOTO: Actor Clint Eastwood speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on Aug. 30, 2012 in Tampa, Fla.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Check out this week's funniest, craziest and buzziest quotes from around the world.

PHOTO: Actor Clint Eastwood speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on Aug. 30, 2012 in Tampa, Fla.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
'I Got Mr. Obama Sitting Here and I Was Gonna Ask Him a Couple Questions'

Clint Eastwood made a surprise appearance at the Republican National Convention Thursday night, calling unemployment in America "a national disgrace" before interviewing an empty chair he addressed as "President Obama."

"I got Mr. Obama sitting here and I was gonna ask him a couple questions," Eastwood drawled, turning his head toward the bare stool.

"Mr. President, how do you handle promises you made when you were running for election?" he asked. "What do you say to people?"

But Eastwood cut off the interviewee: "I'm not gonna shut up. It's my turn," he said.

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PHOTO: Mourners attend a vigil in Aurora, Colo., July 22, 2012.
Christina Ng/ABC
'Forget About Having a Robust Guiding Voice, the Victims Have No Voice at All'

The families of the Colorado theater shooting victims came together publicly for the first time Tuesday in a press conference fueled by pain, anger and frustration over the actions of a charity fund set up to help the families.

In the wake of the shooting that left 12 people dead and 58 wounded, a non-profit called Giving First set up the Aurora Victims Relief Fund, which was supported by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper.

Members of the public and private entities have raised $5 million through the fund, but the families say that the charity has not been working fast enough to distribute the money and that they are not including the victims' families in the decision making process.

The group was led by Tom Teves, whose 24-year-old son Alex Teves died protecting his girlfriend from the gunfire in the theater on July 20, 2012.

"Forget about having a robust guiding voice, the victims have no voice at all," Teves said. "Fighting for justice is not easy for us because we are doing this at a time in our lives when we are in extreme pain."

"It's incomprehensible what we have to do," he said.

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PHOTO: Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney waves to delegates after speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. on Aug. 30, 2012.
Jae C. Hong/AP Photo
'In America, We Celebrate Success, We Don't Apologize for It'

The Republican National Convention delivered its share of memorable moments, among them, Mitt Romney's acceptance speech.

Coming into the convention scarred from the attacks on his record at Bain Capital and the reignited "War on Women," Romney delivered a personal speech addressing his business career, his Mormon faith, and his love for his wife and kids.

"The centerpiece of the president's campaign is attacking success. ... In America, we celebrate success, we don't apologize for it," he declared.

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PHOTO: Astronaut John Glenn with his wife attend the memorial service for Neil Armstrong on August 31, 2012 in Cincinnati, OH.
Bill Ingalls/NASA
'He Was a Groundbreaking Naval Aviator'

Neil Armstrong, the Apollo 11 astronaut who died last weekend, was remembered Friday as a space pioneer, a reluctant hero and a man who bore with dignity the burden of being a national icon.

A private memorial service, in suburban Cincinnati not far from Armstrong's last home, was attended by family, longtime friends and fellow astronauts. Some of them spoke publicly or released statements before or after the service. Sen. Rob Portman, the Ohio Republican who counted Armstrong as a friend, delivered the eulogy, said NASA.

"He was a groundbreaking Naval aviator and the world's most famous astronaut," said Portman in a statement after Armstrong died, "but it was his humble and gracious response to the torrent of attention that followed his accomplishments that may have set him apart most."

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PHOTO: From atop the press box, crews can be seen working to put the finishing touches on the playing field and seating in the Allen Eagle Stadium.
Michael Prengler/AP Images
'There's a Long Tradition in Both Film and Novels of How Important High School Football Is in Texas'

To say that football is a big deal in Texas is a bit like saying it snows in Alaska.

Still, it's hard to imagine that a high school would invest $59.6 million in its football stadium. But that's precisely the cost of the sparkling new Eagle stadium at Allen High School, in Allen, Texas, a Dallas suburb.

"There's a long tradition in both film and novels of how important high school football is in Texas," said Tom Palaima, a professor at the University of Texas, Austin, and a former representative of the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics, a faculty organization that monitors sports expenditures on college campuses.

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PHOTO: Alex Delsordo received this ticket at his dry-cleaner.
Courtesy Alex Delsordo
'I'm Probably Going to Go Back...They Do Nice Work'

Alex DelSordo, 26, isn't going to let a crude name on a receipt keep him from going to his dry cleaner and tailor in Virginia.

DelSordo, who works in advertising sales, has never had any problems with the business, which he asks to remain anonymous, as a customer for the last two years. But earlier this month, two days after he dropped off some dry-cleaning with a male employee, he noticed that the receipt indicated his name was spelled, "A**hole, Alex."

Growing up seeing his parents' restaurants, and realizing that this could cause problems for one of the employees, DelSordo said he wasn't trying to get anyone fired.

"I'm probably going to go back," DelSordo said, adding that he finds the incident humorous. "They do nice work."

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'I'll Do It But It's a Different Way of Parenting'

For many parents, saving for college is becoming more like a personal version of America's national debt crisis.

Parents are ignoring reality and failing to address the tough issues that confront them and their children, a new national survey suggests.

In its sixth annual College Savings Indicator study, investment giant Fidelity found that a minority of families look at the whole picture when considering college and how to pay for it.

Kelly Wickham, an educator in Springfield, Ill., and mother of four children ages 17 to 26, told ABC News she is not contributing to her children's college costs. Instead, she is preparing them to manage their finances so they can manage loan debt after they graduate.

"They are using a lot of disposable income on things like music, clothes, and giant coffee drinks. As a mom I am trying to help them so they do not accumulate that debt later," said Wickham, a parenting blogger for Babble.com, owned by Disney, the parent company of ABC News.

Now that she has learned from her older children, she is planning differently for her youngest kids.

"I'm expecting my children to live with me longer to get on their feet -- which does not thrill me," Wickham said with a laugh. "I'll do it but it's a different way of parenting." Click here to read the full story

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