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    Douglas Blanchard, 51, is a third-generation shrimper living in Grand Isle, La. He was hired by BP as part of the Vessels of Opportunity program. He went out soon after the spill and picked up booms. He says he was among the first seven people to be hospitalized for sickness related to petrochemical exposure. "Before the oil spill, I got a physical, like three months before the oil spill, I went, I had a full body physical, everything, passed the test, everything was good," he said. "Yesterday, I told my wife I wish I would be dead because I didn't feel like doing nothing. Sick, just couldn't do nothing." His wife, Kathy Blanchard, said that life is just not the same and that it breaks her heart to see her husband like this.
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    Levy Brunet, seen here with his wife, Reba, was part of Task Force 2, one of the first vessels of opportunity to clean up the oil spill. After 40 days at sea, he said, he felt dizzy, had headaches and was losing his memory.
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    "That's one of the fears," said Levy Brunet's wife, Reba. "Will he not remember us in a couple of years from now? His children? His grandchildren?"
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    Levy Brunet, a boat captain who is the deacon at his church, says while on a call with his pastor he couldn't remember who he was talking to. "What I can't deal with is the day I'm not going to remember my grandkids," he said. "That messes with me big time."
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    "Nobody wants to admit that one year ago we were all fine, perfectly healthy, and could smoke you anywhere out on water and on land," Darla Rooks, 47, said, pictured here with husband Todd. "Nobody wants to admit that they're ready to sit on a rocking chair on the front porch now and let somebody else run their boat because they don't have the energy to go and pick the shrimp. Nobody wants to tell how bad they feel. I don't want to admit how sick I am to the people that I know. But I have to tell people how sick I am so that I can find out how sick they are."
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    Mike Fraser says he's always coughing. "[I] wake up in the middle of the night coughing," he said.
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    "[The] scariest part is you don't know," said Mike Fraser, seen here with wife Wendy and their daughter. "You don't know the future, the sickness. You don't know the -- what? -- if you're going to be able to shrimp and if shrimp. ... Is anyone going to buy the shrimp?" Wendy Fraser said, "People are afraid. Afraid for his health." She said her husband had never smoked. "Someone who doesn't smoke should not have respiratory problems that he has now," she said. "He didn't have it before."
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    "I worked for wildlife but I was with the burn team and we were burning it [the oil] so we were at the site, within 3 miles from the site most days, and I went through a lot of it where you jet wash usually all white coming out of the vacuum motor from the water and it was like 2 [yards] to 300 yards where it was black," said Malcolm Coco, see here with his daughter.
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