Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    Through his work, philanthropist Bobby Sager has traveled to some of the most war-torn places in the world, coming face to face with children living with conflict and disaster. Taking photographs wherever he goes, Sager compiled his work into a book called "The Power of the Invisible Sun." Sager's images became an inspiration to musician Sting, his friend and fellow philanthropist, who incorporated the images as part of the reunion tour for his legendary band the Police. This photograph of three children was taken in Kabul, Afghanistan, 2002.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    This picture is of a boy named Moises taken when he was 9 years old. He was a soldier in the Congo, and at the age of 7, killed three people. Here, he stands at a child soldier rehabilitation camp in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, 2005.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    This ball was Moises' prized possession. It's made of bits of rubber and rags, and kids in refugee camps use balls like these to kick around until they fall apart. When Sting saw this photograph, he wanted to find a way to give these children soccer balls that are indestructible. A friend asked him to help fund the development of an indestructible soccer ball. Now all the proceeds from Sager's book, "The Power of the Invisible Sun," go to pay for the indestructible soccer balls. This July, Sager traveled back to Rwanda to give out the first one. Moises, the boy who inspired the project, was there among the group of children who received the new soccer balls. Sting and Sager have plans to distribute thousands of the balls all over the world.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    This picture of a 13-year-old student was snapped in Rwanda, 2007.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    A young boy stands among rubble in Kabul, Afghanistan, November 2002.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    Sager said, "When you look into the eyes of these kids … you see some kids smiling in their eyes and sort of overcoming. But in a lot of the kids, you see this sort of desperate blank stare. And to me, it's when you don't see hope in their eyes, you can see how powerful having hope is. The absence of it makes the statement more strongly because it's so profoundly sad to see a kid without hope." This picture was taken in Butare, Rwanda, 2005.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    A group of children stands together at an orphanage in Rwanda, 2004.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    This child lives next to a bombed out mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, 2002.
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    Jalalabad, Afghanistan, 2001. "Hope is the most important thing that people need to move forward," Sager wrote in the forward of "The Power of the Invisible Sun." "The slightest ray of hope can ignite the human spirit's ability to overcome: the power of the invisible sun."
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
  • Person of The Week: Sting

    This photograph was taken during The Police reunion tour in 2008. Whenever the band played the song, "Invisible Sun," Sager's photographs were displayed on a massive screen behind the stage. "Many people said it was the most moving part of the show," Sting wrote in the forward of Sager's book. "The song had been given a new lease on life; a wider, universal context; and, I hope, a prophetic vision of a better future for all the world's children."
    Courtesy Bobby Sager
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